Botanical: Grains of Paradise

[caption id="attachment_8565" align="alignleft" width="250"] By Shaddiii (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons[/caption]Grains of Paradise actually comes from a plant closely related to ginger.

Native to West Africa, the name itself was assigned by European spice traders who sought to inflate the seeds’ price on the European market. Flavorwise, it’s slightly spicy and reminiscent of black pepper and was an inexpensive substitute during the height of the spice trade in the 17th and 18th centuries.

In modern times, we know it for its own flavor which is unique and complementary in gin, imparting a flavor somewhere between black pepper, coriander and cardamom.

Gins featuring Grains of Paradise

St. Laurent Gin

The seaweed in St. Laurent Gin is laminaria longicruris, perhaps better known to sailors of North America as Oarweed. This kind of kelp

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Diep 9 Old Genever

Diep 9 Old Genever starts from rye, wheat, and of course malted barley— all locally grown in East Flanders.  It’s

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Untitled Gin No. 2

Untitled Gin No. 2 is the second gin in One Eight Distilling’s line of aged gins. We previously reviewed Untitled

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Fifty Pounds Gin

The makers of Fifty Pounds Gin have brought to life a gin recipe created and so-named as to mock the

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Devil’s Bathtub Gin

Honeoye Falls Distillery starts their self described “New Western Style Gin” from locally grown rye, which forms the foundation for

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Gustaf Navy Strength Gin

Rating: Contemporary Navy Strength Gin with a strong floral perspective, though it suggests lavender, the rich vanillin and honey undertones buoy

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