Botanical: Licorice

Licorice RootLicorice (alternatively spelled liquorice) comes from the root of a perennial plant native to a large swath of Eurasia. It takes nearly three years for a licorice root to be ready for harvesting, requiring several years of growth. It’s popular in its native regions as both a sweetener and component of natural medicine.

It’s particularly of interest in gin, because the root itself is thought to have been widely used as a sweetening agent in early gins, including some Old Tom styles. Licorice has a distinctive flavor, similar to anise or fennel, but with a pronounced additional sweetness. It’s used in gins for both its flavor and for the sweetening effect.

Gins Featuring Licorice

Wight Mermaids Gin

Isle of Wight Distillery’s Wight Mermaids Gin boasts local coriander— the first commercial coriander operation in England. Mermaids Gin also

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Hepple Gin

Hepple Gin is about process— an unusual one— or should I say, three. The three methods used to maximize the

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Knockabout Gin

Definition of knockabout 1:  suitable for rough use knockabout clothing 2a :  being noisy and rough :  boisterous knockabout games b

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Sacred Gin

I visited Ian Hart’s Sacred Spirits Company headquarters in Highgate, London and interviewed the distiller himself in my most recent Gin:

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