Botanical: Fennel

Fennel bulbsFennel, though often mistaken for anise due to it’s flavor, is not anise. It does contain anethole, which lends star anise its specific flavor. But it’s botanically different. The bulbs contain smaller amounts of the aromatic and are often eaten as a vegetable. In gin we often see the fennel seeds being used for their slight anise like flavor. It’s milder and slightly more vegetal, though often without being told, gin drinkers might think of it the flavor note as anise. In Indian culture, the seeds are often eaten after a meal as a breath freshener, or used as part of a blend of ingredients to create a licorice powder [perhaps leading to another common confusion point].

Common in absinthe, Fennel has become more common, especially in contemporary style gins that emphasize an herbal profile.

Gins featuring Fennel

Nashoba Perfect 10

Back in 2005, a Bolton, Massachusetts winery released a gin. Worthy of remark, especially today, because what we’re tasting is

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Untitled Gin No. 2

Untitled Gin No. 2 is the second gin in One Eight Distilling’s line of aged gins. We previously reviewed Untitled

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Pickering’s Gin 1947

When Pickering’s Gin opened up shop at the Edinburgh based Summerhall Distillery they were the first new gin distillery to

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St George’s Terroir Gin

Terroir. n The complete natural environment in which a particular wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.

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Death’s Door Gin

Death’s Door Gin is something of an “old kid on the block,” having been around since 2006. For the new-to-the-gin-world,

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Gustaf Navy Strength Gin

Rating: Contemporary Navy Strength Gin with a strong floral perspective, though it suggests lavender, the rich vanillin and honey undertones buoy

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