Gordon’s Pink Gin (30%)

Gordon's Pink GinGordon’s Pink Gin is not a Pink Gin cocktail. Other products such as the Bitter Truth’s Pink Gin are indeed the cocktail, but Gordon’s opted for something quite a bit different. Rather than competing with the cocktail, they’re looking to find a way into the increasingly competitive “flavored and sweetened gin” space. Perhaps finding themselves trailing newcomers like Warner Edwards whose Rhubarb Gin has been one of the best selling craft products in all of the UK in 2017 and 2018— Gordon’s needs to reinvent themselves again.

Note: This is a review of 30% ABV Gordon’s Pink Gin from the U.S.A. There is a 37.5 ABV version available in the U.K

Firstly, Gordon’s Pink Gin is bright pink. It is flavored with “Natural flavors and certified colors.” The label is illustrated with fresh summer berries like raspberry and strawberry. And all of this is said to have been based on a late 19th century recipe.

I’d imagine the original recipe would be something more akin to Sloe Gin with fruits rested in gin, and the ensuing mixture sweetened.

Tasting Notes

Lots of strawberry on the nose of Gordon’s Pink Gin. There’s plenty more to the berry note, with boysenberry, blackberry jam and maybe a hint of lemon. But overall it smells very sweet and candy-like. This is not for your everyday fan of Gordon’s Gin.

The palate of Gordon’s Pink Gin begins with some of it’s classic base. A hint of juniper and licorice early. Mid and late palate it’s a berry explosion. Sipped there’s notes of raspberry leaf, red currants, and mixed berry jam. Very sweet and very smooth, Gordon’s Pink Gin is incredibly easy to drink just on its own.

Cocktails

Gordon’s Pink Gin is not designed to be played with in cocktails. It’s more of a backyard BBQ mixing gin. It’s great in a Gin and Tonic. Fresh lime plays off the gin’s berry notes quite nicely in a Gin Rickey. And it’s devilishly good with Bitter Lemon.

Overall, Gordon’s Pink Gin

Fans of classic gin and Gordon’s Gin in general will likely be put of. Gordon’s Pink Gin is a sweetened, colored, extremely fruit-forward gin that while maintaining some of its flagship character as a base— the target audience for this is non-traditional gin drinkers.

But this is where I have to review what’s in the bottle. Although I’ll say it again— this is a sweetened gin not for your everyday fan of classic gin, I do have to give Gordon’s props. They managed to make a floral, perfumed, berry-sweetened gin that’s fairly well done.

It’s delicious on its own. It has a nice mouth feel and a slight amount of juniper character to hold the blend together. I think knowing what Gordon’s was going for, they did a great job.

My biggest critique— and one that I think Gordon’s should take to heart. Pink Gin is a well-established name. Seeing the reviews that people are posting on other sites of this gin, gin drinkers should feel rightfully jilted. I thought I was getting a gin with angostura bitters. And although I was pleasantly surprised, I don’t blame you if you feel like you wasted your hard earned money on something that was misleadingly named.

0 thoughts on “Gordon’s Pink Gin (30%)

  • November 30, -0001by kathy

    Just had Gordon’s Pink G&T on a flight to San Fran, horrible stuff, Aer Lingus had no regular Gordons, had to pay extra euro for Hendrinks. Gordon’s pink is like drinking perfume, someone at Gordon’s should be fired.

  • November 30, -0001by Jan

    This gin is A+ in my book! Being a lifetime gin drinker who has enjoyed gin for 45 years, I do know a bit about gin. I am enjoying Gordon’s Punk right now in a lovely gin and tonic. If I didn’t have to travel across the state line to purchase it, I would drink it exclusively.

  • November 30, -0001by Richard

    Ultimate “Girly” drink?
    But that’s probably misogynistic and insulting. My extremely feminine and feminist better half finds it as disgustingly undrinkable as do I. She’s experimenting with using a bottle we were given in baking. I ask why risk ruining good cake? Gordons, what are you thinking of? I’ve never tasted traditional pink gin – gin and Angostura Bitters – but I suspect the secret lies in the name – Bitters. Why appropriate the name for this sickly concoction? I’m experimenting with a good few shakes of Lea and Perrins, but suspect I’ll be forced to use it as another reviewer suggests – to clean the toilet!

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