Botanical: Cassia

CassiaCinnamomum cassia is differentiated from “true” cinnamon. Although similar, it comes from the bark of a different species. Though if you’re in the United States, you might never know the difference. There, cassia is often sold as cinnamon.

Cassia is prized by distillers however. The bark is thicker, and although some describe the flavor as being “less delicate” than true cinnamon, the thicker, hardier bark is better suited to distillation. Cassia itself in gin imparts an aroma that is easily recognizable to most as being cinnamon-like.

In stores, Cassia can often be recognized in stick form for it’s thick, single layer sticks. Often very stiff, they are also hard to grind. Cinnamon has thinner layers and is easy to break and grind.

Gins featuring Cassia

Seagram’s Extra Dry Gin

Seagram’s Extra Dry Gin has been continuously produced since 1939. For a long time, Seagram’s Gin was The American gin. Distilled

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Knockabout Gin

Definition of knockabout 1:  suitable for rough use knockabout clothing 2a :  being noisy and rough :  boisterous knockabout games b

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No. 209 Gin

No. 209 Gin is a surprising elder statesman among American gins. First produced in 2005, the distillery whose license was

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St. Laurent Gin

The seaweed in St. Laurent Gin is laminaria longicruris, perhaps better known to sailors of North America as Oarweed. This kind of kelp

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Bulldog Gin

Bulldog Gin may be “English,” but the botanical blend and influence is from a vastly different part of the world:

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Coppers Gin

Vermont Spirits’ captures a little bit of North Vermont terroir in their Coppers Gin. The signature botanical being locally foraged

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