Botanical: Lemon

LemonThe most common citrus fruit used in gin. Distillers use lemon rind to impart the distinctive, citrus aroma. Native to Asia, the lemon has been known to Europeans since the first century AD; however, European cultivation didn’t become common until the Renaissance period.

Like Gin, lemons were sometimes carried on 18th century Naval vessels. Navy Strength Gin for the officers’ private enjoyment, and lemons to prevent scurvy among the officers and crew.

Gins featuring Lemon

Wight Mermaids Gin

Isle of Wight Distillery’s Wight Mermaids Gin boasts local coriander— the first commercial coriander operation in England. Mermaids Gin also

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Hepple Gin

Hepple Gin is about process— an unusual one— or should I say, three. The three methods used to maximize the

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Nikka Coffey Gin

Yes, that Nikka Coffey. From one of the biggest names in the world of Japanese whisky comes their Nikka Coffey Gin,

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Calamity Gin

Calamity Gin— Get it, Calamity Jane?— is produced by Southwest Spirits and Wine.  A large Texas based distillery, they produce

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Ki No Bi Gin

Could Japanese Gins be the next Japanese whiskey? That’s the bet of a group of Japanese distilleries who are getting

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Glorious Gin: Oaked

Distilled from a base of wheat, Breuckelen Distilling’s flagship Glorious Gin is creamy, terpenic and distinctive. The team has been

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Knockabout Gin

Definition of knockabout 1:  suitable for rough use knockabout clothing 2a :  being noisy and rough :  boisterous knockabout games b

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