Botanical: Lemon

LemonThe most common citrus fruit used in gin. Distillers use lemon rind to impart the distinctive, citrus aroma. Native to Asia, the lemon has been known to Europeans since the first century AD; however, European cultivation didn’t become common until the Renaissance period.

Like Gin, lemons were sometimes carried on 18th century Naval vessels. Navy Strength Gin for the officers’ private enjoyment, and lemons to prevent scurvy among the officers and crew.

Gins featuring Lemon

St. Laurent Gin

The seaweed in St. Laurent Gin is laminaria longicruris, perhaps better known to sailors of North America as Oarweed. This kind of kelp

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Jōcassee Gin

From South Carolina’s Dark Corner Distillery, Jōcassee Gin pioneers a new regional style toponym. Dubbed “American Southern Style” for its regional

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Hendrick’s Gin

Hendrick’s Gin launched in 1999. It likely needs no introduction. Hendrick’s Gin was launched by William Grant & Sons at

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Bulldog Gin

Bulldog Gin may be “English,” but the botanical blend and influence is from a vastly different part of the world:

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Nautical Gin

Nautical Gin is “inspired by adventure.” Hailing from New Hampshire, Vertical Spirits’ adventuresome gin sources botanicals from nearly every continent.

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