Botanical: Lemon

LemonThe most common citrus fruit used in gin. Distillers use lemon rind to impart the distinctive, citrus aroma. Native to Asia, the lemon has been known to Europeans since the first century AD; however, European cultivation didn’t become common until the Renaissance period.

Like Gin, lemons were sometimes carried on 18th century Naval vessels. Navy Strength Gin for the officers’ private enjoyment, and lemons to prevent scurvy among the officers and crew.

Gins featuring Lemon

Chapter One Gin

Perhaps Temple Distilling’s signature gin’s name is tongue and cheek— an acknowledgment of sorts— that in the crowded gin shelf—

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Green Hat Gin

Green Hat Gin is a grain-to-glass gin distilled at New Columbia Distillers’ distillery in the outskirts of Washington D.C. Beginning

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Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin

Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin hails from That Boutique-y Gin Company’s line of one-off and limited-edition gins. David T. Smith (author and

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Craftsman Gin

River Bend Distilling in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin is both a winery and a distillery. Therefore, it shouldn’t be a surprise

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Roku Gin

In Japanese, roku means “six.” Suntory’s take on gin is called “six” after six quintessentially Japanese botanicals. Firstly, there’s green tea

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Wight Mermaids Gin

Isle of Wight Distillery’s Wight Mermaids Gin boasts local coriander— the first commercial coriander operation in England. Mermaids Gin also

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Hepple Gin

Hepple Gin is about process— an unusual one— or should I say, three. The three methods used to maximize the

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