Gin Reviews

Pickering’s Gin

pickerings-gin-bottle

In <100 Words

On July 17th, 1947 the following events occurred:

….and it was held secret for 66 years until Pickering’s Gin was launched in 2013. Juniper + 8 other botanicals, including coriander, cardamom, angelica, fennel, anise, lemon, lime and cloves.

Impressions

On December 31st, 2014 I tasted Pickering’s Gin and the following things occurred:

    The nose has a slight emphasis on coriander. also Herbaceous Juniper, and a slight touch of citrus on the edges. The palate begins with fresh pine forest and lemon zest. Juniper is really the most striking thing about the palate. There’s a lot of depth and complexity in the background notes These notes include hints of violet, lemon, black peppercorn and fennel.

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Gin Reviews

Averell Damson Gin Liqueur

averell-damson

Another New York take on Sloe Gin, Averell Damson Gin has two things going for it: The Damson is another local specialty, and upstate farms are known for their Damson harvests. The second thing is, for a cordial gin, it’s bottled at a relatively high proof: 66. Because of that you get a strong, spirit that holds up to drinking neat and in cocktails. Let’s take a closer look.

Tasting Notes

The color is a deep burgandy red, bole/terra rosa, with a rich brown note.

Neat, the nose is spicy with hints if cinnamon and ginger. Cherry jam in the middles notes with sweet raspberry with a tart edge in lows. Touch or orange and citrus highlights as well.

On the palate, starts with a beautiful flourish of spice and fruit up front, rising in unison with a sharp and bright rise. Little bit of gin notes in the background, what tastes like a hint of juniper, with some spice again.

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Gin Reviews

Filliers Oude Graanjenever (5 years)

Filliers Oude Graanjenever

We are a gin blog. But to neglect Genever is like forgetting to call your parents on their birthdays. Its gin’s predecessor, the ancestral spirit from which modern day gin evolved.

What is Genever (quickly, in <100 words)

Genever is graded on a scale from jonge, to oude, all the way up to korenwijn by  how much of the spirit is made up of malt wine and how much sweetening is legally allowed. In addition to sugars, distillers add botanicals (juniper chiefly) to create the drink’s unique flavor. Genever highlights the base spirit’s character and its primary flavor generally comes from that rather than the botanical mix.

About Filliers Oude Graanjenever (in <100 words)

Firstly, if a product bears the name graanjenever, it must have been distilled in Belgium, the Netherlands, or a couple small parts of Germany of France. The term is protected as a name based appellation. It also means that a spirit is distilled from only malt and grain.

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Gin Reviews

Beefeater London Market

beefeater-london-market-bottle

My good friend and buddy David T. Smith recently hooked me up with a few minis/samples from his extensive collection when I was in London last month. One of those gaps in my gin notes was the Beefeater London Market variation, released right around the time Beefeater Winter and Beefeater Summer (warning, one of my earliest reviews on this site: ).

I realize this gin is probably quite difficult to find, as it was a limited edition, and it came out a couple of years ago. Sorry for being a few years late to the party.

In <100 Words

Part of a series of gins put out by Beefeater just as the gin renaissance was exploding, London Market adds Cardamom, Pomegranate Seeds, Kaffir/Makrut Lime leaves to the standard beefeater set of botanicals. Released in 2011 in European markets, it is no longer being produced or widely available.

Impressions

The nose has a little bit of a floral lilt in the high notes, with lime coming through clearly, then lemon and orange, with a tinge of citric acid.

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Gin Reviews

Bombay Amber

bombay-amber-bottle

Perhaps the best part of doing this new series of impressions is that I no longer have to hold back on sharing some tasting notes, just because I don’t have a full bottle of the gin. While I’d love to spend some time tasting Bombay Amber in a series of cocktails, it’s really just not plausible. That is unless I’m able to schedule a flight which connects/goes to Las Vegas, Toronto, Singapore, or Sydney. Though I’ve been doing a fair amount of traveling this year, those cities have eluded me. For now. Though I’ve got my eye on you Sydney.

I’ll spare you my thoughts on travel retail*, and get down to the gin.

In <100 Words

Take the standard Bombay Dry Gin [] botanical blend, and add smoky black cardamom, nutmeg, and the zest of a type of bitter orange. Could it be Seville? Myrtle Orange? Or maybe even Amara?

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