Tonic Water

Bradley’s Kina Tonic

kina-tonic-bottle

Occasionally, it takes me a while to get around to getting a review up. I’ve had this wonderful bottle of tonic syrup chronicled in my notes for some time. I unexpectedly received another bottle very recently which prompted me to look in my notes and realize [to my chagrin] that I have not written about this fantastic syrup here.

The story:

Bradley’s Kina Tonic is small batch, made by hand, and hails from Seattle [Hi Seattle!]. It’s alike many other tonic syrups in terms of appearance and aroma; however, you won’t quite know exactly how it differs until you open it up. That’s right, the “spices” labeled on the back are not listed. They’re a secret. You’ll just have to taste for yourselves.

Tasting Notes

The color is a light cocoa, with this hint of rusty maroon, giving it an almost ciderish appearance. The liquid is thick and somewhat viscous; however, not unctuous I’d place it somewhere in the middle, and perhaps slightly less rich and syrupy than other tonic syrups.
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Gin Reviews

Wheel House American Dry Gin

wheel-house-gin-bottle

wheel·house / ˈ(h)wēlˌhous, noun: wheelhouse; plural noun: wheelhouses

    1. a part of a boat or ship serving as a shelter for the person at the wheel. 2. the part of a batter’s strike zone most likely to produce a home run. “Oakland’s closer Street left a fastball in Bonds’ wheelhouse with two outs” 3. a place or situation in which one is advantageously at ease.

Officially it’s definition 1, but I suggest there’s a little a bit of definition 3 here in as well.

In our own <100 Words

Straight from Sacramento City, California, Wheel House Gin is Gold River Distillery’s tribute to the culture of the city and region during prohibition. Enterprising sons and daughters of Gold miners from the Gold Rush weren’t having any of this prohibition business. Taking advantage of the city’s geography, bootleggers used river boats to bring the contraband to the speakeasies of the city. Those brave souls steered their ships from the Wheelhouse, or definition 1.
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Gin Reviews

Mohawk Gin

mohawk-gin-bottle

Perhaps you’re saying “not again, Aaron! another plastic bottle?”

I do not try to be biased in which gins I choose to reviews. Craft, rectified, or big-names. I aspire to give them all a fair shot. As in, I’ll let them stand on their own merits [or lack thereof]. I think that it’s important to sometimes go out and pick up some of these gins that I oft pass over, since in a world where despite gin’s ubiquity in cocktail menus across the nation, these inexpensive plastic bottles are what many people’s first taste of gin is. These gins are among the biggest sellers and most common gins in this country. And yet nary a word is written about them.

I’ve seen Mohawk Gin on the shelves of Buffalo area liquor stores growing up, and until a recent trip back, I hadn’t ever actually given it a try. Until Now.

In < 100 of our own words

Mohawk Gin is surprisingly part of a diverse portfolio of brands owned by Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc.
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Gin Reviews

Goodman’s Gin

goodman's-gin

Goodman’s is a newly released small-batch gin from the Netherlands: a partnership between Paul and Gerda de Goede  and a historic artisan distiler. Goodman’s Gin was inspired by the Florida Keys, and is part of an emerging pattern of brands being designed to “drink neat,” but also “mix well with everything.” We’ve been drinking gin neat here for years, and its exciting to have more and more folks paying attention to that space, though for most bartenders and gin-drinkers, its the cocktails that still hold the most weight.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, juniper, sweet orange rind, a little bit of a cassia and grains or paradise as well. There’s a faint spicy, sort of sweetness in the background here. Quite nice, leaning classic.

The palate is strong and assertive, especially upon first sip. Juniper with a little bit of heat up front, quickly spreading to the sides. The heat is a little bit bracing, but the flavors of the other botanicals begin to shine through.
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Gin Reviews

Waterloo Antique Barrel Reserve Gin

waterloo-barrel-aged

Waterloo Antique is the darkest Barrel Aged Gin we’ve seen yet. It’s dark brown, almost root beer or cola hue sets it apart. (Is this really an aged gin?) Another aspect of Waterloo Antique that is rare among aged gins is both the length of the aging and the methodology. It is composed of a blend of gins, each which have been aged different lengths of time, and in some cases as much as two years.

Tasting Notes

Wow, what a nose on this gin! Sweet, caramel, brown sugar and pecan pie, even a slight touch of dark rum. There’s some citrus and honeysuckle in the background, but this one is a stunner. Unlike any gin I’ve ever nosed before. It presses the buttons of what exactly you think an aged gin can be.

On the palate, it begins a little quiet than expected, with hints of rosemary, grapefruit. There’s a pronounced rich honeysuckle notes in the mids, rich and syrupy before the palate seemingly turns over itself, with a roar of spice and citrus, you’re getting hints of clove, allspice, nutmeg and then some tart lemon rind.
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