Gin Reviews

Goodman’s Gin

goodman's-gin

Goodman’s is a newly released small-batch gin from the Netherlands: a partnership between Paul and Gerda de Goede  and a historic artisan distiler. Goodman’s Gin was inspired by the Florida Keys, and is part of an emerging pattern of brands being designed to “drink neat,” but also “mix well with everything.” We’ve been drinking gin neat here for years, and its exciting to have more and more folks paying attention to that space, though for most bartenders and gin-drinkers, its the cocktails that still hold the most weight.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, juniper, sweet orange rind, a little bit of a cassia and grains or paradise as well. There’s a faint spicy, sort of sweetness in the background here. Quite nice, leaning classic.

The palate is strong and assertive, especially upon first sip. Juniper with a little bit of heat up front, quickly spreading to the sides. The heat is a little bit bracing, but the flavors of the other botanicals begin to shine through.
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Gin Reviews

Waterloo Antique Barrel Reserve Gin

waterloo-barrel-aged

Waterloo Antique is the darkest Barrel Aged Gin we’ve seen yet. It’s dark brown, almost root beer or cola hue sets it apart. (Is this really an aged gin?) Another aspect of Waterloo Antique that is rare among aged gins is both the length of the aging and the methodology. It is composed of a blend of gins, each which have been aged different lengths of time, and in some cases as much as two years.

Tasting Notes

Wow, what a nose on this gin! Sweet, caramel, brown sugar and pecan pie, even a slight touch of dark rum. There’s some citrus and honeysuckle in the background, but this one is a stunner. Unlike any gin I’ve ever nosed before. It presses the buttons of what exactly you think an aged gin can be.

On the palate, it begins a little quiet than expected, with hints of rosemary, grapefruit. There’s a pronounced rich honeysuckle notes in the mids, rich and syrupy before the palate seemingly turns over itself, with a roar of spice and citrus, you’re getting hints of clove, allspice, nutmeg and then some tart lemon rind.
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Gin Reviews

Beefeater Burrough’s Reserve

beefeater burroughs reserve

When Beefeater announced Burrough’s Reserve Gin back in 2013, the echoes were immediately “so look here, the big guys have decided to get into Barrel Aging their gin.” And the big guys indeed. Beefeater who has been quite busy this decade, with seasonal blends and city versions. Burrough’s Reserve represents a bold attempt to capitalize on name and begin to take some of the emerging, but still small Aged Gin market.

In Our own <100 Words

“The Gin for Free Thinkers” it proudly proclaims in its marketing materials, to borrow five words from Beefeater. Nevermind, that Oak resting isn’t quite “new” [Seagram's, many small distillers in the US] on its own. What is novel, or rather rare, is the use of wine barrels. In this case, Burrough’s Reserve is rested in Jean De Lillet barrels made of French Oak. For those taking notes, French Oak is said to impart “sweeter,” smoother and more “creamy” notes, with long lasting floral notes.
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Cocktails

Mxmo #88: Hainuwele’s Gin

Hainuweles-gin

Does the coconut not get the respect it deserves? Coconut is everywhere! It’s a bonafide trend, the water at least. I mean, few billion dollar industries can complain about “not getting respect” and come out sounding unlike this guy. But I suppose this week’s MxMo theme, courtesy of JFL at Rated R Cocktails does have a point: aside from the ubiquitous and often underwhelming Piña Colada, Coconut doesn’t have the same prestigious place in the cocktail fruit pantheon as Pineapple or Blackberry. So, in the spirit of the challenge, can we bring coconut back to the stage? Can we make it the star? Give it a reason to be kept behind the bar? And most importantly can I laugh in the face of all that is holy and sacred in food pairing and make gin and coconut work together? Take that Flavor Bible*.

Direction

I thought that my challenge was going to be pairing the astringent foresty notes of a good gin with coconut’s creamy richness.
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Gin Reviews

Brockman’s Gin

brockman's gin bottle

Books and Covers seem a common theme here at The Gin is In. Bottles often tell us a lot about a product, in particular one where we might be willing to try something new, it can be the only thing we have to go off of. Fortunately for distillers, brand loyalty as strong as it is, is not as strong as “spirit loyalty,” and the willingness of people to experiment or try something new is why the hundreds of new spirits entering the market stand a chance. Sure, I want a vodka, but perhaps I want a new vodka today. Or in this case [and every case on this site], gin.

And what might bring you to purchase a new bottle of gin? Surely if you’ve done your research or brought a smart phone you might look for tasting notes. Or Reviews. But other times, you might not put that much work into it.
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