Botanical: Orange

Bitter OrangeAlthough few things rhyme with it, orange is popular among gin distillers. The orange most commonly used is not the one you would usually bite into, nor make juice out of. It’s in fact the bitter orange, which is renowned for its oil-rich rind and powerful citrus aroma. Though for many distillers who simply state “orange,” we don’t always know who might be using which varieties. The bitter orange frequently used in gin sometimes goes by “bitter orange” or “Seville Orange.”

Rarely, distillers use sweet oranges as well. However, their rinds have fewer oils and therefore don’t impart as much orange flavor .

Gins featuring Orange

Coppers Gin

Coppers Gin begins with a little bit of a terroir approach; Vermont Distillers use hand-picked Vermont grown juniper berries. Produced

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Chapter One Gin

Perhaps Temple Distilling’s signature gin’s name is tongue and cheek— an acknowledgment of sorts— that in the crowded gin shelf—

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Very Old Tom (Batch 1)

That Boutique-y Gin Company’s Very Old Tom is yet another unusual offering from the team behind the series of innovative

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Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin

Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin hails from That Boutique-y Gin Company’s line of one-off and limited-edition gins. David T. Smith (author and

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Craftsman Gin

River Bend Distilling in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin is both a winery and a distillery. Therefore, it shouldn’t be a surprise

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Roku Gin

In Japanese, roku means “six.” Suntory’s take on gin is called “six” after six quintessentially Japanese botanicals. Firstly, there’s green tea

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Cardinal Gin

Southern Artisan Spirits boasts an all-organic blend of botanicals for their Cardinal Gin. Located in the foothills of the Blue

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Counter Old Tom Gin

Counter Old Tom Gin is the Batch 206 Distillery’s take on the hard-to-pin-down Old Tom style. Distilled from grain, Batch

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