Botanical: Angelica

Angelica Archangelica The common variety of Angelica used in gin has been cultivated as a vegetable since at least the 10th century in Northern Europe. Often, the root is used in gin, owing to its intense, fragrant odor, though others parts, including the seeds, may be used.

Angelica archangelica is native to a large portion of subarctic Europe and Northern Hemisphere. The plants can be quite tall, growing up to 8 or 9 feet. The plant comes from the same family as celery, fennel and caraway. Owing to its ubiquity, the plant has been a common ingredient in gin for centuries, and often forms part of the base accord of juniper + coriander + angelica that most gins begin from.

Gins with Angelica

Explorer Gin

Interestingly enough, although Swedish brand Explorer Gin seems custom made for the European market (bottled at the much lower 37.5%

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Silver Dry Gin

`While in Finland, I made sure to check out of the state run Alko stores. While the gin selection was

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Plymouth Gin

At one point, Plymouth Gin was considered a geographically protected product within the E.U. In 2014,  Pernod Ricard declared their

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St. Laurent Gin

The seaweed in St. Laurent Gin is laminaria longicruris, perhaps better known to sailors of North America as Oarweed. This kind of kelp

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