Botanical: Angelica

Angelica Archangelica The common variety of Angelica used in gin has been cultivated as a vegetable since at least the 10th century in Northern Europe. Often, the root is used in gin, owing to its intense, fragrant odor, though others parts, including the seeds, may be used.

Angelica archangelica is native to a large portion of subarctic Europe and Northern Hemisphere. The plants can be quite tall, growing up to 8 or 9 feet. The plant comes from the same family as celery, fennel and caraway. Owing to its ubiquity, the plant has been a common ingredient in gin for centuries, and often forms part of the base accord of juniper + coriander + angelica that most gins begin from.

Gins with Angelica

St. Laurent Gin

The seaweed in St. Laurent Gin is laminaria longicruris, perhaps better known to sailors of North America as Oarweed. This kind of kelp

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Hendrick’s Gin

Hendrick’s Gin launched in 1999. It likely needs no introduction. Hendrick’s Gin was launched by William Grant & Sons at

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Bulldog Gin

Bulldog Gin may be “English,” but the botanical blend and influence is from a vastly different part of the world:

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Diep 9 Old Genever

Diep 9 Old Genever starts from rye, wheat, and of course malted barley— all locally grown in East Flanders.  It’s

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