Botanical: Angelica

Angelica Archangelica The common variety of Angelica used in gin has been cultivated as a vegetable since at least the 10th century in Northern Europe. Often, the root is used in gin, owing to its intense, fragrant odor, though others parts, including the seeds, may be used.

Angelica archangelica is native to a large portion of subarctic Europe and Northern Hemisphere. The plants can be quite tall, growing up to 8 or 9 feet. The plant comes from the same family as celery, fennel and caraway. Owing to its ubiquity, the plant has been a common ingredient in gin for centuries, and often forms part of the base accord of juniper + coriander + angelica that most gins begin from.

Gins with Angelica

Cardinal Gin

Southern Artisan Spirits boasts an all-organic blend of botanicals for their Cardinal Gin. Located in the foothills of the Blue

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Wight Mermaids Gin

Isle of Wight Distillery’s Wight Mermaids Gin boasts local coriander— the first commercial coriander operation in England. Mermaids Gin also

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Hepple Gin

Hepple Gin is about process— an unusual one— or should I say, three. The three methods used to maximize the

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Nikka Coffey Gin

Yes, that Nikka Coffey. From one of the biggest names in the world of Japanese whisky comes their Nikka Coffey Gin,

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Whyte Laydie Dry Gin

Montgomery Distilling’s Whyte Laydie Dry Gin begins from a base of Montana grown wheat— cultivated on the Montgomery family ranch. It’s

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Seagram’s Extra Dry Gin

Seagram’s Extra Dry Gin has been continuously produced since 1939. For a long time, Seagram’s Gin was The American gin. Distilled

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Knockabout Gin

Definition of knockabout 1:  suitable for rough use knockabout clothing 2a :  being noisy and rough :  boisterous knockabout games b

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