Botanical: Angelica

Angelica Archangelica The common variety of Angelica used in gin has been cultivated as a vegetable since at least the 10th century in Northern Europe. Often, the root is used in gin, owing to its intense, fragrant odor, though others parts, including the seeds, may be used.

Angelica archangelica is native to a large portion of subarctic Europe and Northern Hemisphere. The plants can be quite tall, growing up to 8 or 9 feet. The plant comes from the same family as celery, fennel and caraway. Owing to its ubiquity, the plant has been a common ingredient in gin for centuries, and often forms part of the base accord of juniper + coriander + angelica that most gins begin from.

Gins with Angelica

Coppers Gin

Coppers Gin begins with a little bit of a terroir approach; Vermont Distillers use hand-picked Vermont grown juniper berries. Produced

Read more

Chapter One Gin

Perhaps Temple Distilling’s signature gin’s name is tongue and cheek— an acknowledgment of sorts— that in the crowded gin shelf—

Read more

Very Old Tom (Batch 1)

That Boutique-y Gin Company’s Very Old Tom is yet another unusual offering from the team behind the series of innovative

Read more

Green Hat Gin

Green Hat Gin is a grain-to-glass gin distilled at New Columbia Distillers’ distillery in the outskirts of Washington D.C. Beginning

Read more

Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin

Spit-Roasted Pineapple Gin hails from That Boutique-y Gin Company’s line of one-off and limited-edition gins. David T. Smith (author and

Read more

Roku Gin

In Japanese, roku means “six.” Suntory’s take on gin is called “six” after six quintessentially Japanese botanicals. Firstly, there’s green tea

Read more

Cardinal Gin

Southern Artisan Spirits boasts an all-organic blend of botanicals for their Cardinal Gin. Located in the foothills of the Blue

Read more