Articles Tagged: yellow gin

Gin Reviews

Koskue

koskue-aged-gin

We’ve reached a point in the Gin Renaissance where to merely point out that a Rye Distillery, a five hour drive north of Helsinki is now producing a Rye based barrel aged gin, and that fact alone doesn’t warrant quite the same level of remark.

All of these facts being true, the Kyrö Distillery Company took over a cheese factory in Isokyrö in 2014. Their gin(s)* take a little bit of local, including four botanicals foraged locally to give it that “little bit of Finland” feel. The gin is aged in “small barrels” for “enough time.” They’re aging their Rye in New American White Oak, so I can guess that might be their choice, but that’s not said for sure.

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Gin Reviews

Bourbon Barreled Big Gin

Big-Gin-Bourbon-Barrel-Aged

Bourbon Barreled Big Gin. 100% Corn base spirit, with a relatively traditional botanical bill buoyed by Tasmanian Pepperberry and Cardamom, the folks at Captive Spirits Distilling rest their flagship gin in barrels formerly used by Heaven Hill Distillery for their Bourbon.

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Gin Reviews

Long Table Bourbon Barrel Aged Gin

Canada - Long Table Aged Gin

The distillers at Long Table Distillery [among Vancouver’s first btw] take their classic London Dry Gin and age it in 30L oak barrels, formerly used to hold Bourbon. Their Bourbon Barrel Aged Gin is a limited edition spirit, with a pleasing goldenrod hue to it. It. Alike their other gins, this one rests on a foundation of botanicals from wild and other sources around the world, and has been distilled on their 300 L copper pot still.

Impressions

Lemon and white grapefruit zest on the nose, with buttery, wood laden notes just underneath. Cinnamon toast notes of butter, cinnamon sugar and even caramel. Really melds some of the olfactory character of both bourbon and gin. A lot to like here.

The spirit itself has a nice viscosity, and the aromatic character evolves steadily and gently on the palate. There’s also a heaviness to it that’s quite nice. Twisted lemon zests, crisp oak, flaky pastry and silky vanilla notes. Pine-laden juniper comes on toward the finish along with a touch of fennel. The finish is medium in length with a nice warmth, accompanied by a late hint of mintiness and anethole.

Quite nice on its own, it shows a lot of promise as a mixer.

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Gin Reviews

Filliers Barrel Aged Gin

Filliers Barrel Aged Gin

Barrel Aged Gins are slowly becoming popular on both sides of the ocean. No longer is the domain of barrel aging a product, one not normally barreled, the exclusive domain of American distillers experimenting with their future whiskey barrels. Though it does still seem to be more common among distillers who also dabble in the dark spirits.

In our own < 100 Words

The Filliers family can trace their distillery’s origin back to a member of the family who distilled a Genever back in the 1700s. Enter today, the family name is still carrying the banner high. The Filliers’ distillery, in addition to the family Genever, also produces whiskey, and their namesake “28” gin, so named for the other 28 botanicals which are added to compliment the juniper. Like all families with multiple trades, the barrel aged gin puts the best of their gin world (28) with the best of their whiskey world (the barrel) and produces a wholly new product.

Tasting Notes

The color of the spirit is somewhat blonde, or champagne colored. It has only a faint yellow hue to it, remarkably lighter than other aged gins we’ve tried here.

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Gin Reviews

Hernö Juniper Cask Gin

Hernö Juniper Cask Gin

Every now and then, we see a gin which does something so crazy, it absolutely blows our mind.  Before we even get it into our glass.

When I hear about Herno distillery’s intention to age gin in a cask made out of juniper wood, I was absolutely boggled. Firstly, and pardon this preconception held by those of us who mostly encounter these small little garden variety junipers, with scraggly winding branches that peel and flake. All in all, I didn’t think you could do anything with the bark whatsoever.

The peoples of Europe have long used juniper; however, it wasn’t quite valued as a wood product. Juniper wood has issues with the way it knots, the type of grain, and its has only come back into vogue as a source of lumber due to technology which can mitigate some of these defects. Let me quote from sawmill which specializes in juniper some of the reasons why juniper isn’t usually used for casks, and can be cost-prohibitive to do so:

“The answer is to accept juniper for what it is.  It is beautiful, local and challenging.  It is not easy, normal or boring. 

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Gin Reviews

No. 209 Barrel Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon

no-209-cabernet

White wine, meet red.

Earlier we reviewed No. 209’s Savignon Blanc Barrel Reserve Gin, and we were quite a fan of its novel take on Aged Gin. This is the red wine version of that same gin, this time rested in Cabernet Sauvignon Barrels.

Its color is a rich deep shade of golden brown, close to an almond shell. It is much darker than the Sauvignon Blanc for comparison.

Tasting Notes

A very interesting and quite unique nose for a gin, lots happening here.

First cardamom, and then Madeira and Sherry. There’s a bit of that similar lemon and citrus rind note from the Blanc version, but the gin notes seem a little more in the background here. Less juniper initially, and unlike other aged gins, a mild nose that doesn’t assault you with oak and overt signs of aging.

The palate is complex as well: oily citrus and cassia initially. A robust full bodied middle, with juniper, pepper, baking spices and a bit of heat. The finish is somewhat oaky, but largely Sherry, with oxidized fruit, grapes, apple. Very smooth the whole way through. Complex and thoroughly enjoyable neat.

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Gin Reviews

Wood’s Barrel Rested Treeline Gin

woods-aged-gin

Here we have another award winning gin from the state of Colorado. Wood’s Treeline Barrel Rested Gin took a silver earlier this year at the ADI’s craft spirits judging. I was on the panel, and I admit being rather impressed with this sample, although at the time I had no idea what gin it was [I did write in my notes, “never had this one before.” So of course, when the kind folks at Wood’s High Mountain Distillery offered to send me some samples of their gin, I was quite excited to give the gin a closer look in my test kitchen.

Firstly, the barrel rested gin is simply a barrel rested version of their main Treeline Gin offering in terms of botanicals. However, while the main offering is bottled at 40%, the barrel rested is bottled at 45% and therefore has a slight amount more kick. It has a pronounced, bronze/golden huge. Looks fairly darker than probably 2/3 of the aged gins out there, but nowhere near as dark as say Few’s.

What does it taste like? Nose is classic aged gin to me. Juniper, a hint of char. Woodsy, hints of cedar and smoky grain.

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Cocktails

MxMo LXXI: the Halja Cocktail

Firstly, you might be wondering about the theme and the name. The theme From Crass to Craft, put forth by Scott Diaz over at Shake, Strain and Sip challenges us thusly: “Create or find a drink that uses one or more ingredients that are not considered “craft” but are or can be used in a “craft” cocktail.”

Back to the name ‘Halja.’ Yes, it is the origin of the name “hell,” but let’s back up again.  Hel was a goddess in the Norse tradition and her name [as well as the word from which our ‘hell’ comes from, the Protogermanic word Halja] means “one who covers up or hides something.” 

This name seemed perfect for this. I’m hiding the fact that our main ingredient [a very specific kind of flavored vodka] is not really a craft ingredient by putting it in a drink where it not only shines- its most definitely the star- but its less desirable qualities are masked in beautiful fashion. Hence the name Halja, because frankly, I thought that it was going to require god-like capabilities to make the kind of drink I expect from top-end cocktail establishments with the kind of ingredient that rarely rises above the level of shots for college students who really haven’t acquired a taste for alcohol yet.

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Experimental Collection: Barrel Aged Gin

corsair-barrel-aged-gin

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, then you probably have already heard and seen some of the gins in Corsair’s line of spirits reviewed already.

The fact that there are even three offerings in gin to review is a testament to the level of experimentation  and creativity that Corsair Artisan Distillers line of spirits shows. For example, among their other offerings (that aren’t gin) they have an Oatmeal Stout and Chocolate Mocha Porter whiskey, a spiced rum, pumpkin spice moonshine, and a vanilla bean infused vodka. While I’m often excited to see a distillery try one gin, Corsair has pushed it to a new level offering three different gins.

How does their experimental barrel aged gin hold up? Let’s delve forth. First, we sip it neat.

Neat The nose is a little heavy on ethanol. You can definitely tell there’s some alcohol in here. But if you back away, and waft it a bit, you can pick out some citrus and a sweet sugary note of vanilla. Not a whole lot of oak or aged notes on the nose, it surely doesn’t overwhelmingly strike you as aged, or even gin at that rate.

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Gin Reviews

Imperial Barrel Aged Gin

roundhouse-imperial-aged-bottle

Hearkening back to the Barrel Aged Gin tasting a few weeks ago, I’ve become acquainted on a rather intimate level with several quite excellent aged gins.

Roundhouse Spirits of Colorado has created a barrel aged version of their mainline Roundhouse Gin. It has a gorgeous golden brown color, similar to a nice mead, and crystal clear. Imperial comes in at 94 proof [47%] and a message on the front of the bottle says aged in new oak barrels for at least 6 months.” So we know that we have here is an aged gin which is longer aged than most other aged gins out there.

Tasting The nose is a bit sweet, but overall rather heavy on alcohol. A little bit of caramel, candied orange rinds, and a bit of burn.

Upon tasting neat though it begins rather sweet. Similar to Roundhouse Gin, there’s a floral character here. Primarily chamomile, but a little bit of violet too. The floral rolls kindly into a wave of rich spice. Spicy notes of cloves and nutmeg, hints of roasted allspice and quiet cinnamon. There’s a deep rich earthiness here, a but the oak is rather less prominent than it is in some other gins, which have even been aged less.

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