Articles Tagged: Tennessee

Gin Reviews

Abernathy Gin

Abernathy Gin Bottle

Abernathy Gin in <100 Words

The Tenn South Distillery hails from the town Lynnville (pop. 287 as of 2010). The town motto is “striving to be the best small town in America.”  Within that tradition, Tenn South Distillery harvests local Giles County white corn and does everything on site in their distillery. All of their spirits are “grain-to-glass,” and are distilled in their Vendome Copper Pot still. The gin is vapor infused with a blend of nine botanicals and is designed from the ground up to be a contemporary styled gin with Southern touches such as the addition of Pecan.

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Genever

corsai-genever

There’s a whole lot of gins experimenting with Genever-style warm wheat bases, but surprisingly few craft distillers outright experimenting with Genever.

There’s probably an element of business logic in there. Gin is a hard sale to some as it is, but at least people know what to do with it what they get it: whether that’s Tonic, Martini, or even Gin and Juice. But Genever?

Genever falls into a category of secondary spirit styles. Some of these secondary spirits have their day. Mezcal has emerged from the shadows and is now trendy and showing up at places not known for cocktail craft. Cachaça is hot and only going to get hotter. Expect the whole world to be talking it when the World Cup and Olympics hit Brazil in 2016. Some of these secondary spirits, such as Arrack or Aquavit, never quite have their day in the sun but still have their ardent supporters. Genever is in this later category. Those who know Genever, know it, and know what to do with it. And to those who don’t, it’s a hard sell. Therefore if you’re a small distiller trying to keep yourself afloat, you’re going to tie your fortunes to known and established spirits.

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Experimental Collection: Barrel Aged Gin

corsair-barrel-aged-gin

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, then you probably have already heard and seen some of the gins in Corsair’s line of spirits reviewed already.

The fact that there are even three offerings in gin to review is a testament to the level of experimentation  and creativity that Corsair Artisan Distillers line of spirits shows. For example, among their other offerings (that aren’t gin) they have an Oatmeal Stout and Chocolate Mocha Porter whiskey, a spiced rum, pumpkin spice moonshine, and a vanilla bean infused vodka. While I’m often excited to see a distillery try one gin, Corsair has pushed it to a new level offering three different gins.

How does their experimental barrel aged gin hold up? Let’s delve forth. First, we sip it neat.

Neat The nose is a little heavy on ethanol. You can definitely tell there’s some alcohol in here. But if you back away, and waft it a bit, you can pick out some citrus and a sweet sugary note of vanilla. Not a whole lot of oak or aged notes on the nose, it surely doesn’t overwhelmingly strike you as aged, or even gin at that rate.

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Artisan Gin

corsair-gin-bottle

Corsair Gin hails from a part of the United States that you might mistake for “bourbon country.” Corsair Artisan has two distillery locations: Tennessee and Kentucky. It may be that this unexpected location contributes some to the creativity in Corsair Gin. It boasts a rather unexpected array of flavors for a gin and shines in some rather unique ways.

We had the pleasure of tasting Batch 89 of Corsair Gin during our 50 States of Gin tasting. Let’s look a little bit closer.

A closer look, I mean taste. The nose is complex and interesting. The most prominent flavor I get is a deep, broth-like smell that makes me think of the way the kitchen smells when you begin heating up a vegetable stock to make some soup. Hints of citrus and a bit of sweetness strike you early, but not a whole lot of juniper. Interestingly enough, on the nose alone I’m not sure I would pick this out as gin. But that’s not to say it calls to mind comparisons to any other spirit out there, there’s not a vodka or a rum or even bourbon that boasts a similar nose*.

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