Articles Tagged: rye

Gin Reviews

Koskue

koskue-aged-gin

We’ve reached a point in the Gin Renaissance where to merely point out that a Rye Distillery, a five hour drive north of Helsinki is now producing a Rye based barrel aged gin, and that fact alone doesn’t warrant quite the same level of remark.

All of these facts being true, the Kyrö Distillery Company took over a cheese factory in Isokyrö in 2014. Their gin(s)* take a little bit of local, including four botanicals foraged locally to give it that “little bit of Finland” feel. The gin is aged in “small barrels” for “enough time.” They’re aging their Rye in New American White Oak, so I can guess that might be their choice, but that’s not said for sure.

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Gin Reviews

Ivy City Gin

Ivy-City-Bottle

I’d say more distillers are willing to be highly transparent about their botanical bill than their grain bill. The team at One Eight Distilling doesn’t publicly disclose much of their botanicals, but they will be even more specific than you might expect about their grains. This is interesting, as one of the major contentions of the Craft Spirits movement is that “grain to glass” is the only thing which should qualify as craft*.

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Gin Reviews

St George’s Dry Rye Gin

dryryegin

I can see how some people who profess a love of gin might turn their nose up and this fine gin [and more on how fine a gin very soon] and other gins like this [Smooth Ambler’s Greenbrier comes to mind]. Although not officially a requirement of gin, most gins work from a truly neutral spirit base. Not simply in the sense that the base alcohol is “unflavored,” but in the sense that the base flavor brings little to no discernible flavor of its own. I would say that apple, potato and the various types of wheat fall into this category.

But then we have the outliers, the gins that use a neutral-in-definition-only base alcohol spirit: Grape from G’vine and Seneca Drums; and the Whiskey/Rye style base of gins like Smooth Ambler’s and St George’s Dry Rye Gin.

Why might these great gins not win over every gin-drinker? Well because I think in taste and mouthfeel they resemble a nice Genever more than your average gin, and possibly even a White Whiskey.  Are they gin? Most definitely. But sometimes I wonder if there needs to be another category of gin unto itself.

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Gin Reviews

Aviation Gin

aviation_gin_bottle

I’m not quite sure what I was expecting when I cracked open the bottle of Aviation gin. The bottle, the name, the styling: it all said “classic, London dry” to me. For those of you in the know already, it’s truly one of the new breed of American Dry. It is big and bold, but with the juniper in the background. It’s more of the bassist in this band. The citrus and the other flavors are in the front.

I opened the bottle, and was struck by how floral it was. It reminded me of G’vine Floraison; however, upon tasting it was a bit more subtle and balanced, calling to mind the balanced citrus and juniper harmonies in Bluecoat.

As for the botanicals, officially they are listed as:  juniper, cardamom, coriander, lavender, anise, sasparilla and orange peel. Unofficially, orange and juniper are easily detectable while cardamom and sasparilla are nearly undetectable (leave it to the experts, even knowing what I was looking for I wasn’t getting sasparilla). The lavender is present when sniffed; however, seems much more subtle in the drink itself. It is made from a 100% neutral rye base, and I can only hope that the fine distillers in Portland can continue unabated by the Nation’s rye shortage.

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