Articles Tagged: Pot still

Gin Reviews

Conniption Navy Strength Gin

Conniption-Navy-Strength

We’ve previously covered Durham Distillery’s Conniption American Dry Gin, and much is similar. Distilled via a two step process in a German built pot-still, Conniption Navy Strength Gin still splits the botanicals into two batches for distillation (vacuum, and traditional) to maximize the aromatics expressed in the final product.

Like other Navy Strength gins, this one is bottled at 57%, giving it a bracing on its own character that is well suited to cocktail mixing. But more on that in a bit.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, coriander, resinous juniper, a touch of English cucumber  and a delicate hint of caraway towards the back end.

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Gin Reviews

Dillon’s Unfiltered Gin 22

Dillons-Unfiltered-Gin-Bottle

We’ve talked a bit about Dillon’s work before, reviewing a few months ago their quite excellent Cherry Gin (). Whereas their Cherry Gin [among a couple others from their lineup] use a Rye base, their Unfiltered 22 is something of a change-up, an ode to the Niagara Peninsula where grapes and wine are among the regions’ specialty. Using a local grape base, gives this gin a bit more of a French touch, and puts it among some pretty lofty company with gins like G’vine Floraison (), Seneca Drums (), who also hail from famous wine regions and who use the local grapes.

The team vapor distill their gin and do not filter it, so that it retains more of the essential oils from the botanicals.

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Gin Reviews

Citadelle Gin

citadelle-gin

Citadelle Gin is something of the “Elder Statesman” of the new style of gins. It’s been around long enough to have “always been there” to many, but that is to lose sight that at one point Citadelle was the bold, surprising, innovative new gin on the shelf. Their story is complex, but we’re going to try to make it as succinct as possible.

In our own < 100 Words

Citadelle is half revival, half new innovation: the revival is based on one the first gin produced in France at the “Citadelle.” The innovation is in the where and the how. Maison Ferrand Distillery and the SW corner of France is best known for its Cognac. But perhaps the boldest part was the revelation that during the offseason when they legally couldn’t distill Cognac, they could distill gin. The government finally relented in ’95, and so began the magic of open flames [don’t try this at home] and pot stills: Citadelle 2.0 was thusly born.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, hints of violet, sweet orange, coriander and floral brightness. Leans slightly citrus, but there’s another side here as well, with hints of a spicy/floral deeper notes: nutmeg, cinnamon and cardamom.

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