Articles Tagged: Plastic bottles

Gin Reviews

Mohawk Gin

mohawk-gin-bottle

Perhaps you’re saying “not again, Aaron! another plastic bottle?”

I do not try to be biased in which gins I choose to reviews. Craft, rectified, or big-names. I aspire to give them all a fair shot. As in, I’ll let them stand on their own merits [or lack thereof]. I think that it’s important to sometimes go out and pick up some of these gins that I oft pass over, since in a world where despite gin’s ubiquity in cocktail menus across the nation, these inexpensive plastic bottles are what many people’s first taste of gin is. These gins are among the biggest sellers and most common gins in this country. And yet nary a word is written about them.

I’ve seen Mohawk Gin on the shelves of Buffalo area liquor stores growing up, and until a recent trip back, I hadn’t ever actually given it a try. Until Now.

In < 100 of our own words

Mohawk Gin is surprisingly part of a diverse portfolio of brands owned by Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. It was acquired in 2007 as part of a vast array of products from Boisset [which include bigger names like Hypnotiq, Pama and Christian Brothers Brandy].

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Gin Reviews

Shiver Gin

shiver-gin-bottle

We return to the great white North, strong and free! for yet another gin that we found while on our Canadian vacation. Though from the same distributor [and distillery as far as we can verify], Shiver Gin is markedly different than Iceberg Gin, in both presentation [a simple bottle] and flavor [well, you’ll see].

In our own <100 words

Shiver’s minimalist appearance tells it all. Shiver gin is about being environmentally friendly [recyclable bottle] and keeps the focus squarely on the gin. The water is pure [highlighting Newfoundland and Labrador’s greatest resources] and it factors prominently in the literature on the product. The vodka underneath this gin is quadruple distilled. But other than that there’s not a lot of story on this product. It’s just an inexpensive gin in a plastic bottle. Or is it?

Tasting Notes

The nose is pine, juniper, angelica with some lemon and orange notes. The low notes also lean towards the citrus with a slightly floral tweak. Pleasant notes of baking spice. Bright and fresh. Upon first nosing, it dispels the notion that the bottle defines its contents. Its nose is much more complex and inviting than you’d expect based on the graphics, labeling, and bottler material alone [don’t judge a book by it’s cover].

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