Articles Tagged: Pennsylvania

Gin Reviews

Pathogin (Batch 16)

Pathogin Batch 16 Bottle

Can it be true? Rumors abound that Stay Tuned Distillery in Pittsburgh, PA has closed. The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania distillery had something of an interesting partnership with Virginia’s Copper Fox Distillery. Partnering up to create a gin based on Copper Fox’s distinctive malt base spirit, the team at Stay Tuned produced a truly seasonal gin, with each batch having its own unique character, embracing the variation inherent in their process. The botanical blend they chose is called G7b5, named for the musical chord. This review is for their Batch 16 variation.

Tasting Notes

You can quickly detect the warm malty character on the nose, but there’s a bit more going on here as well.

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Gin Reviews

Wigle Ginever

wigle-ginever

Everytime I tell someone the name of this gin, I usually need to add the qualifying statement: “it’s GIN-ever. No. It’s not a Genever.”

But something interesting is going on in this name. Wigle has taken a bold step towards trying to define this new type of gin [Just as House Spirits tried and was quite successful at doing with Aviation gin and the “New Western” designation] which no longer seems an anomaly or an experiment.

I’ve experimented with a few terms in this space before. “Dutch Contemporary” perhaps? To pay homage to the origins of this whiskey-as-a-base style where the base acts as if a botanical adding flavor to the mix. But then again, why not “Dutch Traditional?” And how do we talk about the classic vs. contemporary spectrum of gin flavors?

Whether or not any of those terms work out, or if “Ginever” catches on, I consider Wigle’s Ginever to be among a different category of gin altogether, and therefore I will have to consider it in light of some of that style’s key characteristics. Let’s briefly review. These type of gins work best in drinks that are more whiskey like.

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Cocktails

50 States of Gin: The Winners of Each Round

Naturally, when there’s 30+ gins to be tasted it cannot be done all at once. As much as we’d like to try, to do a proper tasting our livers and mental capacities just couldn’t take it. So in order to give every gin a proper tasting and a fair shot, we spread it out into 6 mini tastings over the course of a long day. So as promised, here’s a recap of what we tasted side by side and with what–  and I’ll share with you my top two from each heat.

For full gin reviews of every gin covered in the 50 States of Gin tasting, you’ll have to stay tuned to the Gin is In this fall. If my first post was the 10 miles high overview, this is the one from 50,000 feet. The full reviews will be on the ground: up close and personal.

Heat #1 ///

The Participants: Dogfish Head Jin from Delaware [the nation’s first state, I’m sure you see where we’re going with this], Pennsylvania’s Bluecoat Gin, Southern Gin from Georgia, Gale Force Gin from Masscahussetts and finally, New Hampshire’s Karner Blue gin.

Overall a strong opening.

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Gin Reviews

Tub Gin

tub-gin

“We kindly invite you to shut your questioning trap, and enjoy,” says the movie one sees if they click on the ingredients link on the Tub Gin website. Well, if you’re going to be so confrontational about it, I might as well just up and review it and tell you what I think of the gin that you say is made from “fresh Colorado juniper berries and a few other things we found lying around the place.”

But first, let me tell you the story of how I found Tub Gin. Of all places, in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania state run liquor stores. For those of you who don’t know PA and don’t know about the arcane laws that some states in this union still practice, Pennsylvania State Run Liquor Stores are the Sahara of booze. They’re wastelands of overpriced mainstream liquor. So imagine my surprise when I stumbled upon a gin I’d never seen before. Yes, I follow TubGin on Twitter,but I’d never seen it in a NYC store. So of course, I had to have it.

Tub Gin is a gin drinkers gin, that is for sure. The flavors it boasts are classic.

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