Articles Tagged: Licorice

Gin Reviews

Pink 47 Gin

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Old St. Andrews’ Pink 47 Gin pushes the envelope in a couple of novel directions. Featuring 12 botanicals (including almond, cassia, nutmeg and juniper), I caught an interesting note about it which indicates that it features TWO(!) different kinds of coriander and angelica among its ingredients.

Yes, while garden angelica is the most common angelica in gin (Angelica archangelica), it’s far from the only edible kind of angelica- and the floral character can vary from species to species. Angelica Lucida is a coastal plant which is eaten as if a celery. Wild Angelica (Angelica sylvestris) is an edible, pernicious weed, run rampant in the Canadian maritimes. There’s others two, so clearly plenty of candidates for a second angelica ingredient….

Pink 47 is based on a neutral grain spirit and bottled in a faceted pink diamond bottle.

Impressions

Nice, bright juniper nose, with a modicum of leafy herbs and a some clear coriander mixed in there as well. Very classic, with the herbs and minty notes a bit lower in the mix, coming through more clearly as the spirit warms.

Overall, the spirit feels thinner than expected on the palate. Lots of crisp, juniper reveling in its herbaceous side.

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Gin Reviews

Colorado Gold

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Sometimes I get a sample of a gin that hasn’t  actually crossed my radar at all. I hate to say it, but Colorado Gold? This is the rare gin that I hadn’t heard anything about before it ended up in front of me to taste. I’m not sure I can tell you any story about it other than that David was able to obtain me a sample while at the ADI Conference in Colorado this past Spring.

What I can say [and thanks to a little bit of internet research to back this up] is that Colorado Gold Gin is part of the illustrious tradition of Colorado distilling.

Local grain [✓] Local and sourced water [✓] Juniper [✓]

Something Local + Juniper = Colorado Gin, without exception.

Now I’m not a big believer in the “water thing,” in that water affects the final character of a beverage in a unique and distinct way. But I do like that for some places, like Colorado, water is an important part of life and the terroir culture. So of course, sourcing the water and using spring water is important to Coloradans and therefore should be part of their distilling culture*.

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Gin Reviews

Knockeen Hills Elderflower Gin

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Some gins you have a really abstract name and you don’t quite know what you’re getting into. Abstract concepts, animals, words, geography. All good names in and of themselves, but they tell you little to nothing about the spirit. A lot of times that’s where I come in.

Knockeen Hills’ Elderflower Gin. You don’t need a gin expert to tell you that there’s elderflower in this gin. It says right on the bottle. I will assure you. There’s truth in titles.

Tasting Notes: Nose: bright summer elderflower, surprisingly prominent juniper. And a bit of heat. Coming in at a respectable 47.3% ABV that note doesn’t seem out of place.

Palate: Licorice out of nowhere. It’s of the ilk of black jellybeans. I went back to check the nose. Not a whole lot not to indicate where this was coming from. Licorice notes fade, and you get a mid palate floral note without the usual sweetness of most elderflower spirits. Juniper, sharp stabbing in the middle. The finish is with a distinctive faintly citrusy spiciness [coriander likely] and a bit more licorice and flowers. The finish is enduring and a bit hot.

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