Articles Tagged: honey

Gin Reviews

Apiary Gin

Apiary Gin

The concept behind Tamworth Distilling’s Apiary Gin is bees (truth in names). The spirit is flavored with locally, foraged, poplar and red clover, and then sweetened with local, New Hampshire raw honey.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Comb 9 Gin

comb 9 bottle

[Image from SummerFruitCup.com]

I’ve made a lot over the base spirit that distillers use to build their gin upon. We’ve seen apple, potato, rye, molasses, corn, and any other manner of grains. But until today, we haven’t seen a gin that uses honey. And to be very specific, orange blossom honey.

Oranges? Orange Blossom Honey is a monofloral honey, which means that it is predominantly the honey produced by bees pollinating a single species of plant. Orange Blossom Honey is highly regarded since at the time bees are pollinating orange flowers, not much else is in bloom. Therefore, Orange Blossom Honey is rather pure, and has a unique bright floral qualities.

StilltheOne Distillery takes advantage of these floral properties and distills a base that is wholly unique and maintains hints of those floral qualities in the end products [which include a vodka and a brandy in addition to their gin].

Nose? Sweet and rich, but simultaneously not that strong. Softly floral. It doesn’t scream out gin on the nose.

Taste? While the nose is rather mild, the taste is vivid. Lots of juniper up front, floral with hints of citrus. Some of the floral notes intimate notes of elderflower and lavender.

Read More ...

Cocktails

The Bees Knees

The Tom Collins is a classic standby for me when in someone’s house. Its easy to make, nearly any kitchen at any house has all of the ingredients. Its a drink I also avoid when out, because there still exists the kind of bar out there that will drown your sorrows with the dreaded yellow kool-aid better known as “sour mix.” Ugh!

So the other day reading up on my cocktails, I stumbled across the Underhill Lounge’s historical investigation of the cocktail known as “The Bees Knees.” The drink is a simple enough cocktail: replace the simple syrup in a Tom Collins with honey, shake and serve.

The honey can be rather cloying and sweet, but it lends a certain gravity to the drink. Whereas the Collins is essentially sippable, the Bees Knees tastes thicker and feels more satisfying. Its the gin drinker’s answer to “sooth your sore throat with a tea and honey.” (unless you fancy a hot gin Toddy, which in that case I’m curious to hear how well that works for you)

Another take on the Bees Knees is held by Jeffrey Morganthaler. He advocates making a simple syrup out of the honey (more Tom Collins like), but he also says that white rum makes an acceptable substitute.

Read More ...