Articles Tagged: Green Hat Gin

Gin Reviews

Ginavit [Green Hat Gin, Fall/Winter 2013 Seasonal]

ginavit bottle

The season: that is the winter, brings to mind the notions of warmth, heat, and coziness. When I think of those words in terms of spirits, I generally thing of “aged,” “warming,” a bit “hot,” and “spiced.” If I were to paint a picture of the ideal winter spirit, it might capture as many of those ideals as possible. Some gins are naturally full of warm baking spice. Some gins are a bit hot, served over 80 proof, giving a nice warm feeling when sipped. And finally some gins are aged. And then yet other gins are all of the above:

What exactly is a “Ginavit”

Technically, an Aquavit should derive its primary flavor from Caraway or Dill, but like gin the notion of “primary flavor” has a great deal of variance from one distiller to another. Additionally Aquavit is rarely solely flavored by Caraway or Dill: other botanicals (herbs and spices) are used to create each distiller’s individual recipe. You might see how there’s a lot that these two spirits have in common right from the outset. Many of the traditional gin botanicals (anise for example) are common in Aquavit as well.

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News

Gin News [October 25th, 2013]

NB Gin Launched this month in Scotland

It seems like the chill in the air is here to stay. Halloween is just around the corner, and so are the holidays. Seems like just yesterday I was basking in the glow of the promise of a summer full of gin and tonics before me. Folks are saying things like “brown spirit season,” and usually this means us gin drinkers become merely a footnote or after thought until summer’s warm tidings beckon us once more. But not this year, Brown spirit season is open and gin drinkers are invited: several new aged gins hit the market in the United States this week, in one of the most exciting launch groups I’ve seen in some time:

What’s New?

II jNB Gin Launched this month in Scotland

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News

Gin News [August 31st, 2013]

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As the summer comes to an “on paper” close with Labor Day weekend, we have a couple very autumnal gin launches to talk about as well as a new gin set to launch this November in Australia. Overall, it’s been a quiet week as most cocktail writers have spent the last week of summer holed up on the beach with gin and tonics, or in the garden frantically harvesting mint to make the perfect Southside before Negroni season opens.

Cheers and happy labor day!

New Product Launches

Who Else Was Talking about Gin this Week?

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Gin Reviews

Green Hat [Spring/Summer 2013]

green-hat-seasonal

It seems like there’s a few hot trends among gin distillers. One of them definitely is the creation of “seasonal” or “limited edition” runs. Green Hat Distilled Gin from New Columbia Distillers in Washington D.C. burst onto the scene just late last year, and in addition to their rather excellent, in this reviewer’s opinion, Green Hat Gin, they’ve released their first seasonal selection for this year’s spring and summer.

As it’s a seasonal gin for spring and summer, I’m heavily assuming this is a gin built for the official drink of summer: the Gin and Tonic. I’m going to factor that heavily into my review of this drink. In my opinion, if you’re putting out a seasonal gin for summer, you’ve got to be able to handle lazy days in the yard -being combined all willy-nilly with lemonade, tonic, or whatever else might be sitting in the cooler. But fear not, I’ll test it in some proper cocktails too, because although I like the idyllic vision of pulling a bottle gin out of the cooler on the beach, I know that properly made bar cocktails deserve a little bit of summer love too.

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Other Thoughts

What’s in a name? The Curious Frequency of Product Name Lawsuits among US Craft Gins

It is inevitable that in a rapidly expanding ecosystem such as microdistilled gins that conflict may arise. However, one thing that has been surprising to me is the frequency with which gins distilled in near complete isolation of one another have stumbled across the exact same name. Inevitably, as your name is your identity and how consumers will know your gin, its is important to get it right. In most cases, distillers differentiate themselves with flavors and botanicals to standout. But sometimes those differences aren’t enough [or more accurately, lawyers worry those might not be enough] and two brands take the dispute to court to fight for their name. Here is a short list of some of the more notable gin trademark disputes from the last few years:

  vs.   

2011: Brooklyn, NY and NOT Brooklyn, NY Perhaps the most famous of the gin trademark lawsuits. This one arose when Breuckelen Distilling [located in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York] trademarked the name “Brecukelen” [pronounced exactly like the borough] and Miami based distiller Angel Santos trademarked the name “Brooklyn Gin,” which although it is not made in the borough, uses the borough’s identity as its inspiration for the bottle and design.

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Gin Reviews

Green Hat Gin

green-hat-gin-bottle

A couple of weekends ago I paid visit to Washington D.C.’s preeminent Gin distillery. Not only was it great to meet the people behind the operation, see their great space, but I was also amazed at the buzz of activity in their distillery on a Saturday afternoon. People were laughing loudly at a bottling party; there was a constant stream of folks coming in for tastings and tours. I’ve been in some museums that would be envious of the size of the tour group that I saw in the distillery on this Saturday. So all in all, the distillery was quite a hub of activity in what at first sight seemed like a rather out of the way location in Washington D.C.*.

Now there are two things most people want to know about this gin.

One) How does it taste. Two) Why “Green Hat.”

Well I’m only equipped to answer one of those questions. If you want to learn about the Green Hat, go to the New Columbia Distillers’ website. The come back here for the review.

About the Gin, not the Hat. The nose is very floral, very pronounced.

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