Articles Tagged: Gimlet

News

Gin News [December 6th, 2013]

ivy city gin bottle

What’s New?

I’m a sucker for this bottle design. Absolutely Love it.

Who’s Talking about Gin?

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Cocktails

Which Gin works best in Which Cocktail [re-version, July 2012]

A few years ago (and with a much more limited scope of gin experience!) I took a first shot at trying to figure out which gins worked best in a series of classic gin cocktails. Since that initial attempt, I have tried more gins than I can even attempt to count, and I’ve been waiting for the chance to revise my initial list and offer a more nuanced take on how gin works in each of these cocktails.

These cocktails have become my “canon” for reviewing a gin. They’re the old-standbys, the familiar friends whose ingredients I always have in stock. They’re the cocktails that you can go into any bar with its salt and order (perhaps the lone exception in my cabinet may be the “Last Word,” but I digress. The cocktails in the Gin Cocktail Canon are: The Gin and Tonic, Tom Collins, Gimlet,  Negroni, Aviation, Martini and The Last Word. All are fine cocktails and all worthy uses of your gin. But with so many new contemporary gins out there and bold experiments on the classic London Dry out there, it is no longer safe to assume that all gins are created equal.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: The Gimlet

GinuaryWilliam Hamilton @ NY TimesDavid Wondrich @ EsquireCold-Glass.com Gin60 mL4 oz.2 oz2 oz Simple Syrup1/8 oz Lime Juice Cordial15mL1/2 oz. Rose's2/3 oz. Rose's1/2 oz Rose's Fresh Lime Juice1/2 oz. GarnishLime Wedge1 Thin Lime Wedge InstructionsStir w/ ice and serveShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ cracked ice and strainStir w/ ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass

I don’t blame you if you’re as uncertain as I am of how to make this drink. Sure, the ingredients are as clear as day: Rose’s lime juice and Gin. But nowhere else this side of the Martini do you get as much of a variation in the ratio of the two ingredients. David Wondrich calls for 3:1 ratio, which is by far the most “limey” of all of the variations. I find this variation to be best for those who really like Rose’s lime juice. For everyone else, this variation is overwhelming. William Hamilton sits at the other extreme calling for an 8:1 ratio of the two, but he softens it with a 1/2 oz. of the real thing. Sure, that makes it closer to a 4:1 ratio, but keep in mind, Rose’s Lime Juice and Lime Juice are not the same thing.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: The Gimlet

GinuaryWilliam Hamilton @ NY TimesDavid Wondrich @ EsquireCold-Glass.com Gin60 mL4 oz.2 oz2 oz Simple Syrup1/8 oz Lime Juice Cordial15mL1/2 oz. Rose's2/3 oz. Rose's1/2 oz Rose's Fresh Lime Juice1/2 oz. GarnishLime Wedge1 Thin Lime Wedge InstructionsStir w/ ice and serveShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ cracked ice and strainStir w/ ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass

In the early days of Cocktailing by Consensus I took a look at the Gimlet in the spirit of the exercise, but without the same handy chart. Not much has changed in the nearly year and a half since I last looked at this drink.

Rose’s lime juice still advocates for a ratio which uses the most of their product. But I didn’t consider them for the panel of four cocktail variations we’re going to take a look at here. Nothing wrong with having a bias towards using as much Rose’s lime juice as possible, just that the 1:1 ratio was rather uncommon among other recipe writing folk.

Four of the recipes took the 4:1 route, only David Wondrich went 3:1. There seems to be a lot of inconsistency among writers as to whether the Gimlet should be shaken or stirred.

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Gin Reviews

Glorious Gin [at time of review, Breuckelen Gin]

brkgin

I have been excited to try this gin since the day I read that two gin distilleries were opening in Brooklyn, NY.  The New Yorker in me was thrilled that a craft, seemingly regulated out of existence in urban areas, was coming back to the city I lived in.The gates opened this past spring, and a short couple of weeks ago I finally picked up a bottle.

The first thing I noticed was the lovely bottle complete with a classy wax-sealed top. Anxious to try, I  grabbed a knife, slit the wax and poured myself a gin and tonic. The first thing that I noticed was the powerful scent of citrus. The bottled smelled noticeably more of citrus than many other gins I’ve tried – but it wasn’t just the smell, it was the components of the smell, and Brecuklen is the only gin I know of where grapefruit stands so boldly.

The grapefruit is hardly a secret, nor are any of the other botanicals in this gin.  Brad Estabrooke, the distiller himself, told the Village Voice that in addition to juniper and lemon, rosemary and ginger are also in there.

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Gin Reviews

Tanqueray w/ Rangpur Lime

rangpur-gin-bottle

First we reviewed Tanqueray’s entry level gin. We then reviewed their top shelf version called Tanqueray No. 10. We now are going to take a look at Tanqueray w/ Rangpur, one of the earliest craft variations from a major distiller. (Beefeater just seems to be getting into the game in 2010, but this was out in 2006)

Question 1: What is a Rangpur Lime? This is an excellent question. Firstly, it’s not a lime. It’s a hybrid of a lemon and a mandarin orange/tangerine. (picture at right). Also, it doesn’t even really taste like a lime, although it has a strong acid bite to it- which is probably about the only thing it has in common with the fruit you named on the bottle. In China they call it a Canton Lemon. I could imagine that if Tanqueray’s bottles were a distinctive yellow, perhaps they would have gone that route. But green bottles + rangpur = “let’s call it a lime.”

Question 2: If its not a lime, does this drink go well with lime in cocktails? Most definitely. The strong citrus flavor will harmoniously accompany  any citrus ingredients you add to the drink.

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Cocktails

The Gimlet

It’s not just for preventing scurvy anymore.

The gimlet is among the simplest drinks in existence. Gin + Rose’s Lime Juice.  (fresh food types should be aware that if you substitute Fresh for Rose’s you end up with a Gin Rickey.) The devil in the Gimlet is in the ratio though.

If we start at the most extreme version (dating to 1953) we need only a 1:1 ratio of Rose’s Lime to Gin.  For many cocktail drinkers, this might be unbearably sweet. Most recipes use less lime juice.

Unsurprisingly, the Rose’s lime juice site recommends the 1:1 ratio also, which coincidentally uses the most of their product. Drinksmixer barely tips the scales in favor of gin advocating a 5:4 ratio. The “Mad Men” inspired version of the Gimlet recommends a 2:1 ratio in addition to a whole slew of lime slices. Also, ignore the fact they use Vodka, despite vodka not being popular in gimlets until much later. You’re not going to Mad Men for an accurate portrayal of the period, right? Back on topic, Esquire is a fan of the 3:1 ratio. Drink of the Week bills the Gimlet as a “martini alternative” and suggests a 4:1 ratio.

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