Articles Tagged: Gabriel Boudier

Other Thoughts

The Hot Gin Top 10 Chart

I did something like this a couple of years ago, which was the inspiration for me beginning a gin blog. I thought that nearly 6 months into this endeavor, it was time to update my top 10 and see if and how my tastes have changed. Miller’s starts at #1, and I think it might be very hard to find a gin capable of unseating it. But that does not mean I will not try.

Without further ado, the hot gin top 10 for September 2010…

This Week Last Week Weeks on Chart Name of Gin 1 2 2 Miller’s 2 3 2 Hendrick’s 3 1 *DEBUT* G’vine Nouaison 4 1 2 G’vine Floraison 5 5 2 Bombay Sapphire 6 4 2 Bluecoat Gin 7 8 2 Tanqeray Ten 8 1 *DEBUT* Gabriel Boudier’s Saffron Gin 9 1 *DEBUT* Beefeater Summer 10 1 *DEBUT* New Amsterdam

Dropping off the chart: Citadelle (last week, #6), Tanqueray with Rangpur (last week, #7)

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Gin Reviews

Martin Miller’s Westbourne Strength London Dry Gin

martin miller's gin

It’s Miller Time. No, not the  Miller that advertises during football games, nor am I talking about Sabres starting goalie Ryan Miller. It’s Miller’s Gin Time.

Let me begin by getting this out of the way. This is my favorite gin. Hands down. The Miller’s regular strength (80 proof) is a solid choice, somewhat more inexpensive ($31-35 for 1 L) and while it still has all of the outstanding features, they’re just a little less pronounced, and a bit more subtle.

Miller’s gin balances a crisp clean Juniper flavor with a  hint of Citrus sweetness. These two flavors are in such perfect harmony, that Miller’s is the epitome of versatility in gin. Whereas some gins are decidedly Citrus (Bluecoat) and others are about the Juniper (Tanqueray), this gin walks the line and is a good choice for whatever you drink of choice is. Despite the strength of the Westbourne (90 proof) it is remarkably smooth, and very drinkable straight.

As for other London Dry Gins I’ve reviewed, this one strays the least from the classic flavor profile. Miller’s Gin contains some faint hints of other herbs and spices, but nothing like Tru2 or Gabriel Boudier’s.

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Cocktails

Twice Legal Gin: Part 2

The review of the gin I made following the recipe I discussed in part 1 can be summed up thusly. When sitting on a table next to New Amsterdam Gin, Tru2 Organic Gin, and Gabriel Boudier’s Saffron Gin -my friends drank my homemade gin.

The taste of Juniper was overpoweringly strong. There were softer notes from the cinammon and dried citrus that would come through towards the end. It began with juniper, and ended with juniper. The fact that I used Svedka Vodka as a base was undetectable. Svedka was a relatively smooth vodka for the price (~13 dollars / 750mL), but some tasters remarked that it was “harsh” and despite the good flavor it didn’t compare to the smoothness of finer liquors. Next time, I might look for a better base vodka. Considering that the flavor came out spectacularly in just over one week of soaking.

The gin went well in tonic, and the strong juniper overpowered even the cheapest tonic. It was too strong and herbal, closest in aromatic profile to Tru2 and therefore not well suited for more strongly flavored or citrusy drinks. It would have had a compelling bouquet suitable for a martini, if it was smooth enough to be drank straight.

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Gin Reviews

Gabriel Boudier’s Saffron Infused Gin

saffron gin

I mentioned at a party over the weekend that I had bought Saffron infused gin, and the reaction was an assortment of “really?!”, “I don’t think that goes together,” and “I’m skeptical but I’ll try it anyway.”

I’m on board with all three reactions to an extent.

First up is the color. It looks something like a children’s drink resembling Pedialyte or those orange hugs. I had the same sort of cognitive dissonance when drinking the Tru gin. If my Gin and Tonic isn’t crystal clear, it doesn’t feel like a gin and tonic.

As for the taste it goes surprisingly well in a gin and tonic, but prepare not to fully experience the saffron. In a gin and tonic, the saffron and fennel come through, but in a balanced manner. There’s a strange sweet taste- not bad, just strange, almost as if there was already simple syrup in the gin. Despite the sweet undertone, this gin does not go well in a Tom Collins, Martini nor in any other drink that has a strong sweet or sour component.  The flavors seem to clash with one another. Dare I say, I found the perfect gin for a Churchhill Martini, or even to be sipped on the rocks.

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