Articles Tagged: Cocktails by consensus

Cocktails

Rendezvous Cocktail

Oh Go.shBest Bartender EverDr BambooThe Martini Book, by Sally Ann Berk Gin3 parts3 parts3 parts6 parts Cherry Heering1 part Cherry Brandy1 part2 parts Kirschwasser1 part Shake well with ice and fine strain in to a cocktail glass. Garnish with a fresh cherry Fill a mixing glass with ice. Add the ingredients and shake. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with a Lemon twist.Combine liquids in a shaker with ice, shake and strain. Garnish with cherries. Campari1/2 part1 part1/2 part1 part

This recipe was found in Sally Ann Berk’s The Martini Book. I’m not sure the precise origins, but this is actually a rather surprising little drink. The Campari takes the medicinal edge off of the Cherry Heering/ Brandy/Kirschwasser.

Bu first, there’s actually a substantial difference between the Cherry spirits used across the three drinks.

A review:

Kirschwasser: clear and colorless German brandy made from a kind of sour cherry. The cherries are fermented with their pits. The result is a cherry flavored, but not sweet brandy. Often called “Kirsch” for short.

Cherry Heering: dark red cherry liqueur, not overly sweet, but slightly medicinal. Considered by some to be the “best” of the dark cherry liqueurs.

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Cocktails

Cocktails By Consensus: Honolulu Cocktail #2

Savoy Cocktail BookMade ManSotally ToberIdrink Gin1 part1 part1 part1 part Benedictine1 part1 part1 part1 part Maraschino1 part1 part1 part (says "Maraschino cherry, but I will give them the benefit of a doubt here)1 part Garnishlemon twist-mint leaves Shake well and strain.stir with ice and strain. stir with ice and strain.mix together with crushed ice, and add garnish.

In the Savoy Cocktail book, there are some obscure drinks whose name origins and references are lost to time. To every Corpse Reviver #2, there is a #1.

While the Honolulu Cocktail #1 contains vaguely tropical things, the #2 comes from seemingly out of nowhere. Maraschino? Benedictine? and of course gin. I’d say the only this drink has going for it is that its equal parts and therefore easy to remember.

But you’d probably be best off forgetting this one.

An almost saccharine, confusing blend of sweet cherry and herbs overpower the gin. Pretty much any gin just falls down here. Its a weird drink, and one whose mysterious name origins are just as opaque as why someone would mix these ingredients in this way.

 

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: Jam in My Gin

Drinking in AmericaThe Gin Blog [UK]Madam Geneva's via YumSugarBrunellos Have More Fun Gin1.5 oz.2 oz [or vodka]2 oz gin Old Tom Gin50 mL Dry Vermouth.5 oz. Lemon Juice.75 oz.30 mL1 oz.1 oz. Simple Syrup15 mL1 oz Creme De Mure Liqueur15 mL Jelly1 tsp RaspberryBlackberry"Spoonful" [Raspberry suggested, but open ended]1 spoonful, seasonal jam. Garnish-One spoonful of jam on top of ice. InstructionsMix; stir w/ ice; strainShake jam, gin, lemon and syrup. Shake with ice, strain and serve.

Ever since first visiting Madame Geneva in NYC, I fell in love with the the combination of gin and jam. But at my last visit, the fabulous cocktail had disappeared from the menu. So now, I am left to my own devices and my own bar for my gin/jam fix. So although I don’t think this cocktail has an official name [that I know of] I went to the internet to see what the consensus is. How do I make a jam cocktail, and in particular are there other variations on the Madam Geneva recipe that I fell in love with.

The 3rd column is the closest in my opinion to the version I had at Madam Geneva’s.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: The Gimlet

GinuaryWilliam Hamilton @ NY TimesDavid Wondrich @ EsquireCold-Glass.com Gin60 mL4 oz.2 oz2 oz Simple Syrup1/8 oz Lime Juice Cordial15mL1/2 oz. Rose's2/3 oz. Rose's1/2 oz Rose's Fresh Lime Juice1/2 oz. GarnishLime Wedge1 Thin Lime Wedge InstructionsStir w/ ice and serveShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ cracked ice and strainStir w/ ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass

I don’t blame you if you’re as uncertain as I am of how to make this drink. Sure, the ingredients are as clear as day: Rose’s lime juice and Gin. But nowhere else this side of the Martini do you get as much of a variation in the ratio of the two ingredients. David Wondrich calls for 3:1 ratio, which is by far the most “limey” of all of the variations. I find this variation to be best for those who really like Rose’s lime juice. For everyone else, this variation is overwhelming. William Hamilton sits at the other extreme calling for an 8:1 ratio of the two, but he softens it with a 1/2 oz. of the real thing. Sure, that makes it closer to a 4:1 ratio, but keep in mind, Rose’s Lime Juice and Lime Juice are not the same thing.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: The Southside

Its summertime, and its time to take a serious look at some cocktails that are appropriate for lounging on the beach. The Southside Cocktail has gotten some serious press lately and seems to be considered part of this summer’s “Cocktail Canon” [right alongside the Gin and Tonic].So I thought it worthwhile to take a look at what people are saying about this drink and how to make the perfect one.

The drink has plenty of exciting origin stories: 1920’s Chicago, dark alleys and prohibition- but the real truth is much less made-for-movies and a likely explanation for why this Hamptons’ favorite is served so frequently on Long Island.

But alas, let me defer to an excellent history on the drink written by Rhett over at “And One More for the Road.”

Leite's CulinariaCockltail ChroniclesBrooklyn GalleyAnd 1 more for the road Gin2 oz.2 oz.2 oz2.5 oz. Lime2 wedges, squeezed Lemon1 oz. fresh squeezed lemon juice (1/2 a lemon)1/2 oz. lemon juice4 lemon wedges Fresh Mint2 sprigs10-12 leaves6 or 7 leaves4-5 mint leaves Club Soda1 splash Simple Syrup1 oz.1 oz. Sugar1 tsp2-3 tsp. InstructionsSqueeze lime into a cocktail glass. Muddle mint with simple syrup and lime; add gin; stir.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: the Alaska Cocktail

Two at the MostSerious EatsCocktail EnthusiastSavoy StompBitters, by Brad Thomas Parsons Gin2 oz.1.5 oz.1.5 oz.2/3 part1.5 oz. Yellow Chartreuse1/4 oz.1/2 oz.1/2 oz.1/6 part.75 oz. Orange Bitters2 dashes1 dash (optional)1 dash1 dash Dry Sherry1/6 part InstructionsStir w ice and strain.Stir w ice and strain.Stir w ice and strain.Stir w ice and strain. GarnishOrange Twist

Another one of these cocktails which date back to the famous Savoy Cocktail Book. Predictably, we don’t have much of a background to explain the where or why. But this subtle variation on the martini (replace Vermouth with Yellow Chartreuse) is a surprising no-show on the cocktail revival scene. While classics such as the Aviation, the Negroni or even the Aresnic and Old Lace adorn the menu of many a cocktail bar worth their salt, this simple drink remains obscured by time.

The Ratios Every ratio from 8 parts gin to 1 part Chartreuse to 2:1  is suggested as a possible ratio for this drink (very reminiscent of the Martini, no?). One notable variation suggests the addition of dry Sherry, but I’m on the fence about even including it as part of the official consensus exercise.

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Cocktails

Cocktails By Consensus: The Bronx Cocktail

Living in New York City and going out for drinks in New York City its impossible to escape cocktail-craft’s elephantine contribution to the lore of [and some might even say the ego] of this fare city. The so-called “New York City Cocktails” loom large. Some of the more famous ones, such as the Manhattan, have inspired books unto themselves. Other boroughs have a century long inferiority complex stemming from the fact that they don’t have a cocktail named after them [Queens*]. But today, we focus on perhaps the second most famous New York City cocktail: The Bronx.

ChowTed Haigh's Vintage SpiritsThe Noble ExperimentIBA "Official" Gin2 oz.1.5 oz gin1.5 oz.6 parts Dry Vermouth1/2 oz.3/4 oz.1/2 oz3 parts Sweet Vermouth1/2 oz.3/4 oz.1/2 oz2 parts Orange Juice1 oz.Juice of 1/4 orange1 oz.3 parts Angostura Bitters1 dash GarnishOrange WheelTwist of orange peel InstructionsShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ ice and strainShake w/ ice and strain

The roughest summary of this cocktail is: think a Perfect Manhattan, made with gin, and a splash of orange juice. Most sources, except the official IBA, mix using equal parts of sweet and dry vermouth.

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Cocktails

The Clover Club Cocktail

GinuaryDavid Wondrich @ esquireWashington PostProfessor Cocktail Gin50 mL2 oz1.5 oz2 oz Lemon Juice30 mL1/2 oz1-2 tbsp3/4 oz. Simple Syrup20 mL Sugar1/2 tsp Grenadine1/2 oz. Egg Whitehalf of one11 large1 Raspberry Syrup3 dashes3/4 oz. Raspberries6 Garnishfresh raspberryMint Leaf InstructionsFirst muddle raspberries. Then dry shake to emuslify egg white. Then add ice. Shake again and strainShake well with ice, strain. Shake well with ice, strain. Dry shake for 10 seconds. Then shake with ice and strain.

Imagine my shock to realize I have not yet covered one of my favorite cocktails in my long running Cocktails by Consensus series. The Clover Club is a sweet, frothy when done properly, crowd pleasing gin cocktail. And yet, despite its easy-drinking profile and pleasant flavors, it never has quite caught on to the same sort of fame as the fruity margarita or the pleasant cosmopolitan. My suspicion is that its definitely the raw egg.

Across the board, everyone agrees that egg white is vital to the cocktail. Most, but not all, bartenders recommend “dry shaking” the egg before hand to create the froth. Though, beware! When eggs are shaken, they release gas and may cause the shaker to explode!

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Cocktails

Cocktails By Consensus: The Poet’s Dream Cocktail

David Wondrich @ EsquireMusings on CocktailsQuiet DrinkingDiffords Guide Gin2 oz.1.5 oz.3 oz.1 shot Dry Vermouth1 oz.3/4 oz.1/2 oz1 shot Benedictine1/2 teaspoon1/2 - 3/4 oz.5 mL1 shot Mineral Water3/4 shot Orange Bitters2 dashes1-2 dashes (optional) GarnishLemon PeelLemon TwistLemon TwistLemon Twist InstructionsStir w/ ice, strain into chilled glassStir w/ ice, strain into chilled glassStir w/ ice, strain into chilled glassStir w/ ice, strain into chilled glass

This is one of those cocktails that is just all over the place, and you might be hard pressed to find a consensus on anything about. Its origins (along with many famous cocktails) can be traced in print back to the Waldorf-Astoria bar book.  First you have the Difford’s Guide version- the easiest one ratio wise to keep in your mind, a little heavy on the Benedictine in my opinion and lacking the essential Orange Bitters. Personally I favor the Musings on Cocktails version (2:1:1) which gives enough Benedictine to balance what otherwise feels a bit too much like a Martini (the Esquire version).

The cocktail works best with a bold juniper forward gin. But I don’t think that you should shy away from experimenting with the contemporary style gins here.

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Cocktails

Cocktails by Consensus: Leap Day Cocktail

SlateInstitute for Alcoholic ExperimentationSavoy StompIce + Clink + Drink Gin2 oz.40 mL1.5 oz. 2 oz. Grand Marnier1/2 oz.10 mL1/2 of 3/4 oz1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth"Scant" 1/2 oz.10 mL1/2 of 3/4 oz.(Carpano Antica)1/2 oz Lemon Juice"Generous" 1/2 oz.1 dash1 teaspoon 1 dash GarnishLemon TwistLemon TwistLemon Peel (squeezed on top)Lemon Twist InstructionsShake and StrainShake and StrainShake (with reservations) and strainShake and Strain

As the origin for the leap day cocktail is rather clear, we don’t see a ton of variation. Slate’s version is by the far most different, opting for an increased quantity of lemon juice. Savoy Stomp’s quantities aren’t actually different, they instead opt for precision of the original’s quantities. 2/3 of the glass measurement used in the the original book is approximately 1/2 of 3/4 of an ounce. For you fraction addicts out there, 3/8 of an ounce will do.

Happy Leap Day!

Source #1: Slate Source #2: The Institute for Alcoholic Experimentation Source #3: Savoy Stomp  Source #4: Ice, Clink and Drink

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