Articles Tagged: classic gin

Gin Reviews

Gordon’s Gin

gordon's gin -bottle

Here’s another in another in a series of famous/popular gins that I’m giving a better treatment to. I think that my initial review of Gordon’s might not have given the same thorough treatment that I’ve given other gins. Given its status as one of the most senior gins out there [having been produced since 1769!] I think it would only be right to give it a more thorough review.

As before, the original review is still available if you want to see what we originally said.

In <100 Words

Ask some pedants “What’s your favorite Scottish gin” and they might reply “Gordon’s.” Although it originated in England, the UK version is currently distilled at Cameron Bridge in Scotland. The variation I have was not distilled in Scotland, it was distilled in Canada, and bottled in Norwalk, Connecticut. Gordon’s is truly international. So the idea that it’s of the place where it is distilled is somewhat nonsensical. It is British in origin, but it’s provenance has transcended the place where grain is turned into gin.  It’s purported to have at least four botanicals in it. Juniper, coriander and angelica are oft repeated and likely to definitely be among the bill.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Fleischmann’s Extra Dry Gin

Fleischmann's-Gin-Bottle

Charles Louis Fleischmann, along with his brother, produced America’s first commercial yeast product. He revolutionized baking bread in America. Founded in 1868, the very same plant became home to America first distilled dry gin and vodka. The label proudly declares itself “America’s first gin,” and why not? Surely our architecture can’t compete with the half-a-millennia or older buildings that are routine across England, but its curious that James Burrough’s 1876 founding of Beefeater earns him founding father status in gin history, but the Fleischmann brothers are mere footnotes. The gin is as classic, and as old, as many of those, and yet rarely earns a mention in the same breath…

Tasting Notes

Juniper and spicy, dusty coriander on the nose, while an intimation of celery and pine hovers in the background. The palate itself is smooth and rich. It begins quietly, biding its time while juniper builds. Mid-palate, you won’t be mistaken for what you’re drinking. Dusty coriander again, comes on mid and ushers in the finish. A twist of lemon hovers in the background, and pine-note heavy juniper delivers a crispness and astringency to the finish. The finish does have a slight sweet off-note, faintly of acetone.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Zuidam Dutch Courage

Netherlands---Dutch-Courage

So the name, “Dutch Courage,” is attributed to a possibly apocryphal story about the origin of gin in England. Supposedly when the English were fighting alongside the Dutch in the 20 years war, the Dutch took a swig of a spirit before rushing into battle. This spirit made them bold! Made them powerful! Made them courageous. Hence the name “Dutch Courage.” The stuff they were drinking? Genever. The ancestral spirit which led to the development of gin.

Truth be told, the term probably didn’t exist until much later. But nevertheless, good story right?

Impressions

The nose has juniper, lemon, and a lovely Bombay-Sapphireesqeue note of exotic coriander. The nose is well-rounded with a lovely citrusy undertone. Quite nicely balanced and quite classic. The palate is citrusy at first, but with a rich spicy character, with notes of violet, anise, and pine-note accentuated juniper. Hints of walnut and nutmeg in the late palate, leading into the finish. Moderate in length with a dry clean finish, this is easy drinking, well-balanced classic gin.

Seems like a good mixing gin at a good strength as well. I’d try it in a French 75 or Tom Collins.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Two Birds Gin

twobirdsgin bottle

First, we detour from the world of gin to the phenomenon of “putting birds on things.” In this case, spirits. Now back to gin. Don’t be confused American drinkers, Two Birds Gin is made by Two Birds Spirits in the UK. Their eponymous gin bears their name, and comes in a couple different varieties. Now, don’t confuse this with Two Birds Artisan Spirits in Michigan who put out the quite excellent Greyling Modern Dry Gin ().

I know what you’re thinking. This is more confusing than the time Watershed distillery put out a gin that competed against another gin called Watershed. Or that time we had two gins called Brooklyn: one made in Brooklyn, and another not. Or that time two gins with the word “green” in their name butted heads in court

Okay, who am I kidding: this kind of stuff happens all the time. And as if it’s not bad enough already, it’s not like Two Birds is the only distillery in the UK that has a bird on the bottle. Maybe the folks on Portlandia were on to something when they declared “put a bird on it.”

Hopefully you’re a little less confused: Two Birds stateside makes Greyling, only available stateside; Two Birds UK makes Two Birds and is only available on the other side of the Atlantic.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Fifty Pounds Gin

fifty pounds gin

The makers of Fifty Pounds Gin have brought to life a gin recipe created and so-named as to mock the “50 Pound” levy that the crown sought to distill on the thousands of home distillers in England during the gin craze during the 18th century. The recipe created, and then locked away (so the legend says) was only recently brought back to life by John Dore & Co. Limited, who did so in trying to respect the original recipe’s intentions.

Tasting Notes

The nose is lemon, lime, juniper, and very classic in character. Just a tinge of sweetness with a touch of creamy lemon as well. The nose is markedly lighter and clearer then the palate.

Juniper on the tip of the tongue, followed by lemon, coriander and angelica. Just a bit of spice, with citrus blossoming in the middle. Heat, very sharp. The finish hints at anise, angelica, juniper and citrus rind. Tart and direct, with a very dry palate cleansing finish. Long residual heat.

Mixing Notes

I mixed up a few gin and tonics with this gin: very acidic with a lot of bite and tang. I really felt it needed the lime to add some sweetness to balance out the flavor, I really thought it was a touch too dry and almost plain without the lime.

Read More ...

Philosophy

Is there room on the shelf for two kinds of gin?

…or perhaps even three. But I’d be getting ahead of myself.

Firstly, the premise. The hook: there’s at least two distinct kinds of gin out there.

The Bourbon/Rye Parallel: It’s not as night and day as say rum vs whiskey. Even when both are aged, you can clearly distinguish between the two. It’s more of a distinction between say Rye and Bourbon. I know, at your local dive bar, or for folks who make cocktails once a year, having a “whiskey” is sufficient. But when is the last time you’ve seen a cocktail menu of any repute simply call out a whiskey, as if to imply to the drinker, the finer points don’t quite matter here?

For example, I don’t have to have had Buffalo Trace Bourbon to ascertain whether or not it fits my tastes. I’m largely familiar with other Bourbons, so although not all Bourbons are the same, I can roughly ascertain, “this might be a sweet, a bit smoother and have less edge.” If I’m looking for something with ‘a bit more spice, something peppery, some heat,” I might opt for the Rye sour….well maybe not, but you see where I’m going with it.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Bombay Dry Gin

bombay-bottle (1)

Today we’re going mainstream.

Yep.

I know a lot of folks like to hear about craft gins, but I also know there’s been a lot of “what do you think about this gin,” where this is a gin that you can find on the shelf of every liquor store worth its salt from sea to shining sea on both sides of the Atlantic.

Today, we’re going to look at Bombay Dry Gin. You might know the name better from the Sapphire blend which was among the pioneers in putting all the botanicals clearly on the back of the bottle [something Bombay Dry does now also] and one of the first crossover gins designed to appeal to folks who don’t really dig the juniper forward gins of yore.

First and foremost, this is a gin of yore. Juniper forward, this is a gin that is classic in style though has a few flourishes to set it apart. Let’s get to the tasting notes, shall we?

Tasting Notes. Neat we have lemon fresh and lots of juniper. Strongly gin like. The lemon notes seem to overwhelm and dominate the nose on this at the end.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Colorado Fog Gin

colorado-fog-gin-786x1024

We continue our journey through the state of Colorado to Mystic Mountain Distillery to try their flagship gin called Colorado Fog Gin.

Nose/Palate: A little bit of juniper and a little bit of alcohol. Immediately recognizable as a gin. Perhaps on the harsher side of the alcohol-on-the-nose spectrum, but not off-putting. A hair strong smelling for 80 proof.

The flavor is straightforward, but sedate. Begins with a flash of heat, the mid notes are where the flavor is. It’s juniper forward but backed off. It’s as if the loudest note is only being played at half strength. A bit piney, but it quickly backs off a bit giving way to a bit of earthy spice underneath the flavor. Hints of angelica and lime. Restrained, and not really trying to overpower the juniper notes. The finish is a bit hot, warm in the corners of the mouth with a slight juniper tinge. Very quiet juniper and very dialed back. In terms of drinking neat, there’s a lot of heat here and a harsh edge, but botanical wise it’s an exercise in restraint and balance.

Mixing With tonic, it still contributes a subtle, but even more dialed back gin like flavor.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Rob’s MTN Gin

rob's mountain gin

Rob as in Rob’s MTN Gin and Rob Masters a.k.a. the head distiller over at Spring 44 [whose gins have been reviewed on this blog before]. Rob has had his hands on more than a couple gins and has been a mainstay on the Colorado Distilling scene for nearly a decade now.

Of course I’m not the one to introduce you to Rob. His story has been covered, so if you want to get to know the man behind the name of Rob’s MTN gin check out this piece from Denver Off the Wagon.

Now that you know the name. Let’s get down to the spirit, because in his own words on his very own website, “it’s all about what’s in the bottle.”

TSTNG the MTN: Bright juniper on the nose, mild alcohol nose. Citrus. Very balanced with an almost single scent nose. A homogeneous balanced blend of botanicals. Very nice, very inviting. I’m excited to taste the gin based on the nose alone.

The palate is bright and nice. Plenty of juniper, but well balanced within the context of other flavors and notes.

Walking you through the taste:

    subtle bright, juniper begins.

Read More ...

Gin Reviews

Dancing Pines Gin

dancing-pines-bottle

Another stop on our Spring tour-de-Colorado distillery tour, Dancing Pines Distillery makes a wide array of spirits. Some of which if I were not a narrowly focused gin writer I would love to talk about. [The Black Walnut Bourbon Liqueur? guilty pleasure city….]

Dancing Pines distinguishes itself with a refreshingly narrow list of 6 botanicals.

Dancing with Dancing Pines Gin: A nice bright nose, juniper and lemon along with a tinge of sweet but pronounced alcohol. The lemon borders on super sweet towards the end of the nose [although still very subtle], almost going in an Uncle Val’s sort of direction. Very bright, and aromatic. Interesting balance, not quite sure if the nose belies a contemporary or classic style gin.

Share This!

Read More ...