Articles Tagged: Beefeater

Gin Reviews

Beefeater London Market

beefeater-london-market-bottle

My good friend and buddy David T. Smith recently hooked me up with a few minis/samples from his extensive collection when I was in London last month. One of those gaps in my gin notes was the Beefeater London Market variation, released right around the time Beefeater Winter and Beefeater Summer (warning, one of my earliest reviews on this site: ).

I realize this gin is probably quite difficult to find, as it was a limited edition, and it came out a couple of years ago. Sorry for being a few years late to the party.

In <100 Words

Part of a series of gins put out by Beefeater just as the gin renaissance was exploding, London Market adds Cardamom, Pomegranate Seeds, Kaffir/Makrut Lime leaves to the standard beefeater set of botanicals. Released in 2011 in European markets, it is no longer being produced or widely available.

Impressions

The nose has a little bit of a floral lilt in the high notes, with lime coming through clearly, then lemon and orange, with a tinge of citric acid. Strong nose that ends on a more classic note. The palate is tart and citrus dominated, with a lemon/lime zest sharpness, likely given a sharper character by the addition of pomegranate which seems to fade into the background.

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News

Gin News, [November 1st, 2013]

Jersey royal potatoes have been made into gin

A couple of new launches in a much quieter week, as most of the gin community continues to buzz about some of the big name launches that are preceding the holiday season. Without further ado, here’s what’s happening in the world of gin this week:

What’s New?

What are People Talking About?

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News

Gin News [October 25th, 2013]

NB Gin Launched this month in Scotland

It seems like the chill in the air is here to stay. Halloween is just around the corner, and so are the holidays. Seems like just yesterday I was basking in the glow of the promise of a summer full of gin and tonics before me. Folks are saying things like “brown spirit season,” and usually this means us gin drinkers become merely a footnote or after thought until summer’s warm tidings beckon us once more. But not this year, Brown spirit season is open and gin drinkers are invited: several new aged gins hit the market in the United States this week, in one of the most exciting launch groups I’ve seen in some time:

What’s New?

II jNB Gin Launched this month in Scotland

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News

From the World of Gin, April 2013

Introducing a new feature here for this month: There’s so much happening in gin outside of what gets written about here. All throughout April, I’ve been collecting some of the biggest stories of the month, as well as reviews across mine and other sites and anything else interesting  that’s happened in gin.

Awards from the Field New Product Launches Who Else Was Talking about Gin This Week?

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Cocktails

Which Gin works best in Which Cocktail [re-version, July 2012]

A few years ago (and with a much more limited scope of gin experience!) I took a first shot at trying to figure out which gins worked best in a series of classic gin cocktails. Since that initial attempt, I have tried more gins than I can even attempt to count, and I’ve been waiting for the chance to revise my initial list and offer a more nuanced take on how gin works in each of these cocktails.

These cocktails have become my “canon” for reviewing a gin. They’re the old-standbys, the familiar friends whose ingredients I always have in stock. They’re the cocktails that you can go into any bar with its salt and order (perhaps the lone exception in my cabinet may be the “Last Word,” but I digress. The cocktails in the Gin Cocktail Canon are: The Gin and Tonic, Tom Collins, Gimlet,  Negroni, Aviation, Martini and The Last Word. All are fine cocktails and all worthy uses of your gin. But with so many new contemporary gins out there and bold experiments on the classic London Dry out there, it is no longer safe to assume that all gins are created equal.

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Cocktails

Negroni Week: Cocktailing by Consensus (Revised, August 2011)

Aaron’s Note: Please excuse this re-post. This isn’t something we normally do around here, but seeing as how this week we’re covering the Negroni cocktail in depth, I felt it worthwhile to re-post this blog post I did earlier this year on the delicious and stimulating cocktail (with a few new editorial comments) Cheers!

Generally the Negroni is considered a “pre-dinner” drink. The bitters, often Campari is designed to stimulate the appetite before a meal. Apertifs and Digestifs in particular are more common in Italian culture; therefore the reputed origin of the Negroni- say Florence, Italy, somewhere around 1919?

Regardless of origin, this drink is classic; however uncommon it may be. In its most general form a Negroni consists of gin (surprise, surprise!), sweet red vermouth, and a bitters/campari. Though in theory an alternative like Cynar could be used, most cocktailians seem to agree that this is a drink for Campari. Though other variations exist, I don’t know if I would call them a true Negroni.

  Source #1 Source #2 Source #3 Source #4 Gin 1 part 1 oz. 1 oz. 1.5 oz. Vemouth 1 part 3/4 oz. 1 oz.

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Cocktails

The “Air Freshener” shot

Earlier this month I wrote about my first gin cocktail. I confess, I did stretch the truth a bit. I did have one gin experience before my gin and tonic. But it is one that I would altogether rather forget. Please let me introduce you to the “air freshener” shot.

This shot requires the piniest, most prickly gin you can find. If you use a good gin, or one that emphasizes a botanical other than juniper, you won’t experience the air freshener in all of its glory. I’ve used Beefeater before, but please don’t feel you have to use a gin of even that quality.

Fill a shot glass 7/8 of the way with very cheap gin Add a splash of grenadine

Stir together, and drink it quickly. If you used a gin with sufficient juniper, the effect will be akin to a cheap pine car air freshener.  The taste is a noxious and overwhelming- and sufficient to turn a drinker off to gin entirely. Now that you know of the air freshener shot, beware, because with great power comes great responsibility. Do not use this shot for evil.

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Other Thoughts

The Hot Gin Top 10 Chart

I did something like this a couple of years ago, which was the inspiration for me beginning a gin blog. I thought that nearly 6 months into this endeavor, it was time to update my top 10 and see if and how my tastes have changed. Miller’s starts at #1, and I think it might be very hard to find a gin capable of unseating it. But that does not mean I will not try.

Without further ado, the hot gin top 10 for September 2010…

This Week Last Week Weeks on Chart Name of Gin 1 2 2 Miller’s 2 3 2 Hendrick’s 3 1 *DEBUT* G’vine Nouaison 4 1 2 G’vine Floraison 5 5 2 Bombay Sapphire 6 4 2 Bluecoat Gin 7 8 2 Tanqeray Ten 8 1 *DEBUT* Gabriel Boudier’s Saffron Gin 9 1 *DEBUT* Beefeater Summer 10 1 *DEBUT* New Amsterdam

Dropping off the chart: Citadelle (last week, #6), Tanqueray with Rangpur (last week, #7)

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Gin Reviews

Beefeater Summer Gin

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Let it be known that I am a fan of interesting flavors in my gin. I don’t shy away from a fruit or obscure herb here and there. That’s why I was ecstatic to try the Beefeater Summer Gin which boasts the power of “elderflower, black currant, and hibiscus.”

The tasting notes are decidedly floral, but the combination of flavors remind me more strongly of pomegranate than of Hibiscus and Elderflower. Elderflower might have been included only as a mixing hint (as in “hint hint: this would be great with St. Germain’s Elderflower Liqueur”). Fans of Beefeater’s classic London Dry Gin will not be disappointed as it is unmistakably Beefeater in taste and mouth feel. At first I could tell immediately that this was Beefeater, and then the fruit/floral notes come in at the end, finishing in a bit more crowd-pleasing fashion.

I would classify this as one of the “gateway” gins for non-gin-drinkers. It would probably mix well with Pama or St. Germain’s. The floral quality makes it a complimentary addition to an Aviation, and a satisfying, if unspectacular gin and tonic. Overall, its refreshing to see Beefeater expanding its reach with craft gins such as summer gin and Beefeater 24, but I would say for just a few dollars more you can find a gin that is much more satisfying and one that won’t be leaving shelves in a few short weeks.

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