Articles Tagged: Apple

Gin Reviews

Seagram’s Apple Twisted Gin

apple gin

Apple Gin is not a new creation. Once a more common cocktail ingredient, it has since been exiled to the furthest corners of the bar and liquor shelf.

The most common question to would-be-buyers of Apple Gin is “what on earth do I do with it.” Well hopefully, I’ll help offer a couple of suggestions later on. But in the meantime, let’s get to the tasting notes:

Tasting Notes

Faint apple juice and faux jolly rancher green apple on the nose. That’s about all. Not a lot of depth, you might confuse it for apple liqueur, of [my first guess], green bottles of apple flavored martini mix. The taste is a bit more of the same, with some juniper tinge on the finish. Sweet apple dominates, hints of citrus and spice on the edges. Doesn’t really push the envelope on the subject. It’s more apple liqueur. Reads as “fake,” which I think hurts it a bit in terms of what you can do with it.

Cocktail Ideas?

With tonic its palatable, but more of the same. The bitterness helps quell the fake apple taste a tad, but not enough to make folks who turned their up at the nose to come back around again.

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Gin Reviews

Cap Rock Gin

cap rock

I normally don’t like to make generalizations. Especially about spirits and their creators. Everyone is different, unique and adds their own spin to things.

But in this case I’m going to make a generalization about Colorado Distillers. Water source is a very important part of what makes their gin. We’ve seen other distillers like Spring 44, and on the larger world scene names like Martin Miller’s who make a big deal about where their water is sources. But for some reason in Colorado, if you’re going to read about a gin [or beer, or any other spirit from this region] don’t be surprised to hear that the water that went into the drink is important enough to warrant mention.

In this case it’s the spirit’s actual name: Cap Rock which references the water which has gone into it. A Cap Rock is a hard impermeable layer of rock, which often covers over another rock formation of softer more permeable types. These underlying rocks are often home to gas, petroleum, or even water. These protected sources don’t bubble to the surface and therefore, in the case of the spring water in this are considered to be quite pure.

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