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Gin Reviews

Williams Chase Seville Orange Gin

Williams-Chase-Orange-Gin

Seville Orange photo from K.B.R. on Flickr.

Not just any orange gin, the Seville Orange is worth a closer look as its not the orange you’re probably thinking of. But this kind of orange often does appear in gin.

Let’s begin: there’s a large class of oranges known as “bitter oranges.” These include the Chinotto [yes, the beverage], the Bergamot, and a famous variety known by its hybrid name which is also the signature orange/citrus flavor of Grand Marnier.

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Gin Reviews

Buss No. 509 Raspberry Gin

Buss No 509 Raspberry

We’ve reviewed some Gins from Buss Spirits before. This past June we took a look at their White Rain Gin (), but the Raspberry was the flagship entry in their Author Collection. Founder Serge Buss, best known for founding Bar Bounce in Antwerp, has since expanded the product range to include the aforementioned White Rain, but also a Peach variation as well. Bottled at a relatively low 37.5 ABV, first impressions have me thinking to expect a spirit with some liqueur like sweetness. The color is vivid, dark rose, with red hues that evoke the simultaneously the notions of fruit punch, but also [and unsurprisingly] raspberries. Let’s get past this book’s cover and get down to bussiness (ha! get it?)

Impressions

Tart berry, cucumber, and faint intimations of banana as well in the background.

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Gin Reviews

Gilbey’s Lemon Gin Collins

gilbeys-lemon-gin

I know it’s not technically something specific to Canada. So, no Canada, I’m not holding you solely responsible for this. But I was impressed by how common Gilbey’s Lemon Gin Collins drink was. I had never seen it before this trip to Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. And it was in every single liquor store. Even the ones that had only three gins on the shelf: It was Bombay Sapphire, Beefeater and this. Diageo Canada is on to something I guess. So clearly something is going on that this is popular enough to be everywhere. I thought, since I hadn’t seen it, and wasn’t sure where I would find it again, that I might as well give it a write up while I’m writing up some of the other more Canadian Gins.

 

In <100 Words

Take one of the world’s biggest inexpensive gin brands and cut out the work of mixing and just throw it in the bottle. There’s a not a lot of story here as this is pretty much exactly what you expect. The ingredients are “water” [cut down on the burn, make it easier to drink], sugar [again, to make it more like a Collins], Natural flavors [are you ever going to mention lemon?], Citric Acid [so it feels like Lemon?] and color.

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Gin Reviews

Seagram’s Peach Twisted Gin

peach gin

Seagram’s has quite the line of flavored gins. We’ve covered quite a few on here so far, and I’ve come to a single conclusion. Your general appreciation of the flavored gin will likely reflect your approach to candy of the same flavor. Like Apple Jolly Ranchers? You’ll probably find the same flavor in the apple gin. With the peach gin— if you like Peach Rings candy, you’ll probably like— or at least fine the flavor unobjectionable.

Tasting Notes

The nose is strong of peach candy. Sugary, peachy, very sweet, with a faint citrus dryness on the tail. Decidedly one note though. You’ll recognize the flavor pretty much immediately. The palate is a bit more nuanced however. Quiet peach shnapps, lemon, on the front end. The middle has notes of juniper, coriander and angelica. The finish is a bit more lemony again, with the peach candy note coming in. Some heat in the back of the palate that has lemon, juniper and peach schnapps. Although the nose screams peach candy, the palate has significantly more in terms of a gin like profile. The peach candy note is there through most of the tasting, though most pronounces on the tail.

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Gin Reviews

Seagram’s Pineapple Twisted Gin

Seagram's Pineapple Gin

Flavored Gin is a harsh sell among gins. Most of the time, the target market for these sort of things is looking for something which is purely the flavor on the bottle. This is where pineapple vodka comes in: it’s pineapple and not much else. But flavored gin is this completely different animal: we’ll give you your pineapple and give it some juniper at the same time.

It’s a bit limiting in terms of scope. You generally mix these outright. You don’t do a lot of cocktail work with them. They’re supposed to be fun and easy to drink. I’ve reviewed other gins from the Seagram’s line before, so I’m a little familiar with kind of the base expectations:

You can craft some cocktails around these gins and come up with some fairly good results. But they don’t really work too well in classic cocktails. Mixed drinks, sure, but cocktails no. So I won’t be overly negative and go into the reason why this makes a weird Negroni or less than stellar Aviation. Chances are, if you’re looking for a flavored gin, you’re not looking for something which does those things*.

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Gin Reviews

Seagram’s Apple Twisted Gin

apple gin

Apple Gin is not a new creation. Once a more common cocktail ingredient, it has since been exiled to the furthest corners of the bar and liquor shelf.

The most common question to would-be-buyers of Apple Gin is “what on earth do I do with it.” Well hopefully, I’ll help offer a couple of suggestions later on. But in the meantime, let’s get to the tasting notes:

Tasting Notes

Faint apple juice and faux jolly rancher green apple on the nose. That’s about all. Not a lot of depth, you might confuse it for apple liqueur, of [my first guess], green bottles of apple flavored martini mix. The taste is a bit more of the same, with some juniper tinge on the finish. Sweet apple dominates, hints of citrus and spice on the edges. Doesn’t really push the envelope on the subject. It’s more apple liqueur. Reads as “fake,” which I think hurts it a bit in terms of what you can do with it.

Cocktail Ideas?

With tonic its palatable, but more of the same. The bitterness helps quell the fake apple taste a tad, but not enough to make folks who turned their up at the nose to come back around again.

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