All Gins from Kentucky

Gin Reviews

Fleischmann’s Extra Dry Gin

Fleischmann's-Gin-Bottle

Charles Louis Fleischmann, along with his brother, produced America’s first commercial yeast product. He revolutionized baking bread in America. Founded in 1868, the very same plant became home to America first distilled dry gin and vodka. The label proudly declares itself “America’s first gin,” and why not? Surely our architecture can’t compete with the half-a-millennia or older buildings that are routine across England, but its curious that James Burrough’s 1876 founding of Beefeater earns him founding father status in gin history, but the Fleischmann brothers are mere footnotes. The gin is as classic, and as old, as many of those, and yet rarely earns a mention in the same breath…

Tasting Notes

Juniper and spicy, dusty coriander on the nose, while an intimation of celery and pine hovers in the background. The palate itself is smooth and rich. It begins quietly, biding its time while juniper builds. Mid-palate, you won’t be mistaken for what you’re drinking. Dusty coriander again, comes on mid and ushers in the finish. A twist of lemon hovers in the background, and pine-note heavy juniper delivers a crispness and astringency to the finish. The finish does have a slight sweet off-note, faintly of acetone.

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Gin Reviews

Mohawk Gin

mohawk-gin-bottle

Perhaps you’re saying “not again, Aaron! another plastic bottle?”

I do not try to be biased in which gins I choose to reviews. Craft, rectified, or big-names. I aspire to give them all a fair shot. As in, I’ll let them stand on their own merits [or lack thereof]. I think that it’s important to sometimes go out and pick up some of these gins that I oft pass over, since in a world where despite gin’s ubiquity in cocktail menus across the nation, these inexpensive plastic bottles are what many people’s first taste of gin is. These gins are among the biggest sellers and most common gins in this country. And yet nary a word is written about them.

I’ve seen Mohawk Gin on the shelves of Buffalo area liquor stores growing up, and until a recent trip back, I hadn’t ever actually given it a try. Until Now.

In < 100 of our own words

Mohawk Gin is surprisingly part of a diverse portfolio of brands owned by Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. It was acquired in 2007 as part of a vast array of products from Boisset [which include bigger names like Hypnotiq, Pama and Christian Brothers Brandy].

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Genever

corsai-genever

There’s a whole lot of gins experimenting with Genever-style warm wheat bases, but surprisingly few craft distillers outright experimenting with Genever.

There’s probably an element of business logic in there. Gin is a hard sale to some as it is, but at least people know what to do with it what they get it: whether that’s Tonic, Martini, or even Gin and Juice. But Genever?

Genever falls into a category of secondary spirit styles. Some of these secondary spirits have their day. Mezcal has emerged from the shadows and is now trendy and showing up at places not known for cocktail craft. Cachaça is hot and only going to get hotter. Expect the whole world to be talking it when the World Cup and Olympics hit Brazil in 2016. Some of these secondary spirits, such as Arrack or Aquavit, never quite have their day in the sun but still have their ardent supporters. Genever is in this later category. Those who know Genever, know it, and know what to do with it. And to those who don’t, it’s a hard sell. Therefore if you’re a small distiller trying to keep yourself afloat, you’re going to tie your fortunes to known and established spirits.

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Gin Reviews

Corsair Artisan Gin

corsair-gin-bottle

Corsair Gin hails from a part of the United States that you might mistake for “bourbon country.” Corsair Artisan has two distillery locations: Tennessee and Kentucky. It may be that this unexpected location contributes some to the creativity in Corsair Gin. It boasts a rather unexpected array of flavors for a gin and shines in some rather unique ways.

We had the pleasure of tasting Batch 89 of Corsair Gin during our 50 States of Gin tasting. Let’s look a little bit closer.

A closer look, I mean taste. The nose is complex and interesting. The most prominent flavor I get is a deep, broth-like smell that makes me think of the way the kitchen smells when you begin heating up a vegetable stock to make some soup. Hints of citrus and a bit of sweetness strike you early, but not a whole lot of juniper. Interestingly enough, on the nose alone I’m not sure I would pick this out as gin. But that’s not to say it calls to mind comparisons to any other spirit out there, there’s not a vodka or a rum or even bourbon that boasts a similar nose*.

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