All Gins containing: Rose

Gin Reviews

Spy Hop Distilled Gin

Spy Hop Gin Bottle

With extremely limited distribution, Spy Hop Distilled Gin, and the rest of the line which includes several other spins on the local fauna of the San Juan Islands are pretty much only available there. And by design too. By keeping their distribution radius small, they cultivate a local following, but also are able to experiment in ways, and on scales that a large scale distiller wouldn’t be able to.

Spy Hop gin is a study in the terroir of the San Juan Islands mashed up with a traditional, global, assortment of ingredients. Cardamom meet local lavender. Local barks meet lemon, orris root meet wild roses and so on.

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Gin Reviews

Ferdinand’s Saar Quince

ferdinands-saar-quince-spirit

Featuring 30 (!) botanicals, Ferdinand Saar Gin is already something of a beast. It combines common botanicals (angelica, coriander, ginger), less common, but still regularly seen ones (lavender, rose) and then there’s those which are really unusual (sloe, rarely seen as a botanical, lemon thyme) – but wait! It’s then cut with Riesling wine (Germany, kind of known for that). And in the case of the Quince gin, it’s a Sloe gin homage, using the local quince grown right at the distillery, with a touch of sweetening. It’s a lovely golden hue.

Impressions

On the nose, there’s ginger, wet, herbal notes, a touch of fruit, slight bits of rose and bobs of vanilla.

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Gin Reviews

Helsinki Dry Gin

Another day of Ginvent, another Impression of a new gin.

I sometimes wonder if we’re finally reaching that breaking point where we won’t be encountering more “the first ______[type of spirit]_______ distillery in ______[fairly well known city or place]________ in ___[number greater than 100]___ years. But not so!

Helsinki Distilling Company is the first distillery in Helsinki since the century before the last one. The origin of the botanicals are proudly shared: the Lingonberries are local and Finnish; the Juniper comes from the Balkans; the Seville Oranges… come from Seville. In addition, there’s lemon, fennel, coriander, angelica and rose. As is becoming more common, it maintains the intensity of its botanicals by not chill filtering it. So gin aesthetic purists, you might find catch yourself crying in your cloudy Martini [further clouding it, oh cruel irony!] A little Ouzo effect never bothered me.

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Gin Reviews

Stovell’s Wildcrafted Gin

Stovell's WIldcrafted gin

Stovell’s is an award winning restaurant in Chobham, England. and their Wildcrafted Eponymous gin is a partnership of bar manager Geyan Surendran and chefs Kristy and Fernando Stovell.

The concept is simple: local, foraged botanicals. A truly local gin. Nothing is in the gin which cannot and does not grow locally. The only exception to their provenance rule is the juniper, which they source from Croatia due to their concern for the local juniper populations, which are still threatened in the UK.

Among the botanicals, couple standout: both angelica root and seed (toasted) are used, as are red efflorescent clover blossoms.

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Gin Reviews

Merrylegs Genever-Style Gin

merrylegs_genever_bottle

The popularity of so-called Genever-like gins, especially stateside isn’t something new as much as it is the pendulum of fashion swinging back in the opposite direction. These gins, which might be more aptly described as Holland style (or Holland style inspired?) are usually pot distilled (rather than column distilled), and the spirit itself is designed to have a malty-grain like character (sound familiar?).

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Gin Reviews

Okanagan Gin

okanagan-gin-bottle

Okanagan Spirits Distillery’s flagship gin is distilled from 100% British Colombia grown fruit, not grain on their copper pot still. Using local spring water they cut the spirit before re-distilling with coriander, spruce, rose and of course juniper. They do a wide array of spirits in addition to gin. including Aquavit, Brandy, Absinthe and Vodka.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, spruce buds, musky rose, grain, some green juniper, and coriander. There’s a grainy/fruit brandy background note present as well. Not quite over the top enough to signal that this is obviously using a fruit base rather than grain, but it does add something to the nose creates a warm aura around the spirit.

The spirit is smooth and warming, though the spirit itself does feel a bit thin as it passes over the tongue. Whisper quiet at first, spruce shoots, orris, violets turn rose-like a bit later. Piney juniper evolves to be a bit more resinous on the finish. Tree sap, lemon, and a scintilla of caraway usher in a finish with grain and a faint touch of fennel stalk. Relatively short finish.

Spruce seems to be the dominant pine character of this gin, lending it a boreal forest freshness, however, the juniper is very much in the background and something you have to look closely for.

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Gin Reviews

Jack Rabbit Gin

beehive-bottle

In < 100 Words

When you think of Utah, you probably think more about the picture below than gin. It can be understood, after all when one thinks about alcohol and drinking, Utah is closer associated with the opposite. Beehive Distilling is doing their best to dispel entirely the notion that Utah and good spirits are opposites. Jack Rabbit Gin is “small batch” and “small scale” featuring local touches (Sage for example) that give it a distinctly regional flavor profile, and floral touches such as rose, which give it a unique and bright flavor with mass appeal potential.

Utah, as I usually picture it.

Tasting Notes

Bright rose hits you right away. Unmissable. But there’s much more happening beneath the surface that keep it from becoming a one-note bomb. Coriander, camphorous juniper and mint background notes, with even lower a touch of orange and citrus in the lows. The rose note immediately draws a comparison to Hendrick’s (), but it really might have out-Hendrick’sed even Hendrick’s with the rose.

The palate surprised me initially, taking an almost left turn. The camphorous mint-like low notes are bright and clear as day on the palate as sage.

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Gin Reviews

Port of Dragons 100% Floral

gin-port-of-dragons-100-floral-437640

Ahhh, Port of Dragons! We meet again!

The mere mention of your brand name makes me feel as if I should be sipping a G&T in Qarth. Or King’s Landing. Have I been reading too much Game of Thrones lately? Perhaps. But let me drop these cultural references and get down to the gin. Does it actually invoke the stark landscapes of Essos or the well traveled paths outside Winterfell? Or Maybe Spain, seeing as that the place it hails from is very real and very much on the cutting edge of innovative gins.

[No this is not a re-post. You are correct that a short while ago we reviewed 100% floral’s companion gin 100% Pure]

The Nose of the Dragon It smells a bit vegetal. Hints of cucumber, and even shrubs. An ambiguous “greenery” smell. Hints of rose emerge from the mix give it a slight “summery” character. I’m picking up a bit of juniper around the edges, but overall it has a contemporary character. But like the Pure, the nose isn’t quite doing it for me.

We get a bit more into the taste. It has a smooth character, with heat slowly building along with the taste.

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Gin Reviews

Hendrick’s [UK version. 41.4%]

hendricks bottle

A peculiar review indeed. But perhaps not for the reasons you might think. We’re taking an opportunity to take a look at an early favorite of the Gin is In’s: Hendrick’s Gin. Really the ultimate in gateway gins. But this time, we’re taking a look at the version of Hendrick’s that you folks in the UK are used to seeing. You see, here in the states Hendrick’s is bottled at 44% or about 88 proof. but in the UK? a full 6 proof points lower. 41.4% or 82.8 proof. Does it actually make a difference? Or has my sentiments on Hendrick’s changed in the last 3 years since my initial review?

Getting down to it: Nose and Taste The nose is heavy on the rose, bright and floral with a hint of alcohol as well. Not something I remember from my initial tastes of even the stronger American version. The taste though is smooth and slow at first, very easy to be drank. But quite, cucumber and neutrality, not much going on. The other flavors accelerate and crash altogether, juniper and earthy angelica, hints of coriander. It fades, leaving a warm alcoholic burn taste in the back of your mouth and a bright hint of floral long after the initial taste.

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Gin Reviews

River Rose Gin

river-rose-gin-front

When I first drove across Iowa, I found it a state that confirmed my expectations while simultaneously defying my expectations. My family never took long car trips. In fact, before I was 22, the furthest west I had ever been was Erie, PA. So let me just say that I had this impression that all I would see upon entering Iowa were field of corn and an unending flatness.

Well firstly, it was May, so the corn was naught but a gleam in a farmer’s eye. But also, who could have thought that moment where the horizon explodes and unravels itself before the unsuspecting driver, stretching itself further out than I suspected eyes could see ahead would have been so stunning. My first experience with the state of Iowa was unexpected- who would have thought I would have hung photos of the Iowa landscape in my apartment years later? But I digress, merely wanting to stop and note that I once found something wholly unexpected in Iowa, so perhaps I shouldn’t be so surprised to find something so unexpected in a gin from the same state.

Stop me If you’ve Heard this One Before A gin that boasts rose and cucumber among its botanicals.

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