All Gins containing: Lime

Gin Reviews

nginious! Summer 2015 Gin

nginious summer gin

Taking a look at the lineup of Nginious! Gins, the summer one is the most overtly, and most over the top non-traditional. Eschewing much of the standards for a wide assortment of exotic and unusual botanicals: Juniper meets blueberry, peach, lime, jasmine (!!!), white pepper, rhubarb roots and rhubarb stalk.

Jasmine stands out as being particularly notable. Perfumers struggled for centuries to properly harness the flavor of jasmine. The delicate buds did not suffer heat well (it destroys the aromatics for which the buds are so prized!), and perfumers used fat to dissolve the aromatics in a method better known as enfleurage. It basically pressed the flowers between pieces of animal fat, until the fat itself became thick and musky with the rich aroma of jasmine. Jasmine is still incredibly hard to distill, and although not optimal, ethanol can be used as a solvent.

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Gin Reviews

St. George Botanivore

st-george-botanivore-gin

From a distillery that’s been in operation since the 1980’s, formally known for their Eau De Vie, the team of Jörg Rupf, Lance Winters and Dave Smith have helped propel the same distillery the frontline of the gin world, making a line of gins that is as well-respected as it is imaginative: the Dry Rye which wears the Rye base on its sleeve, the legendary Faultline Gin, and their “it tastes like Redwood trees, but in a good way” Terroir Gin.

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Gin Reviews

Old St. Pete Tropical Gin

Old St Pete Gin Bottle Photo

From the Sunshine capital of the United States,* comes a gin which seeks to capture that in a bottle. Emblazoned with a giant sun on the bottle, Old St. Pete Tropical Gin rests on that which its namesake sunshine and tropical climate combine to produce the most of: citrus fruit**. But it’s not all sunshine and citrus. Director of Product Development Daniel Undhammer Sr. is a Londoner by birth, who moved to Florida to start his distillery. In a recent Tampa Tribune interview, Undhammer described their gin as a little bit of old meeting new.

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Gin Reviews

Ferdinand’s Saar Quince

ferdinands-saar-quince-spirit

Featuring 30 (!) botanicals, Ferdinand Saar Gin is already something of a beast. It combines common botanicals (angelica, coriander, ginger), less common, but still regularly seen ones (lavender, rose) and then there’s those which are really unusual (sloe, rarely seen as a botanical, lemon thyme) – but wait! It’s then cut with Riesling wine (Germany, kind of known for that). And in the case of the Quince gin, it’s a Sloe gin homage, using the local quince grown right at the distillery, with a touch of sweetening. It’s a lovely golden hue.

Impressions

On the nose, there’s ginger, wet, herbal notes, a touch of fruit, slight bits of rose and bobs of vanilla.

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Gin Reviews

Brighton Gin

brighton-gin-gin

I read an interesting piece about Brighton Gin sometime ago. It was suggested that Milk Thistle (one of the novel botanicals disclosed) was included because the plant itself contains silymarin, a compound reputed to have beneficial effects on the liver. WebMD says the jury’s out, while academic articles seem to indicate there’s some potential there that is being looked at further. The compound itself isn’t soluble in water, but it is soluble in ethanol. Meaning at higher proofs, you’ll get more of it. [solubility is the factor at play when the Ouzo effect/Louche occurs in higher proof spirits, the addition of water causes certain compounds to come out of solution].

But more romantically, the gin itself is distilled in a pub in Brighton.

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Gin Reviews

Genius Gin (Navy Strength)

Genius Gin Navy Strength Bottle

We were quite a fan of Genius Liquids’ Genius Gin when we tried it last year. We also got a bottle of their Navy Strength variety, so this is a long overdue look at that gin. It shares a lot in common with the 45% variety, so for details on Genius Liquids’ unique process we suggest checking out last summer’s review of Genius Gin ().

Impressions

Lavender, resiny, woody juniper and a hint of grain grace the nose, which has a distinct, warming impression. It seems slightly less vivid than their 45% offering; however, it shares the same inviting character.

The palate is loud and quite warm, and although this is as a Navy Strength Gin should be, it strikes me as less over-emphasizing the high proof than some other Navy Strength gins do.

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Gin Reviews

Pickering’s Gin

pickerings-gin-bottle

In <100 Words

On July 17th, 1947 the following events occurred:

….and it was held secret for 66 years until Pickering’s Gin was launched in 2013. Juniper + 8 other botanicals, including coriander, cardamom, angelica, fennel, anise, lemon, lime and cloves.

Impressions

On December 31st, 2014 I tasted Pickering’s Gin and the following things occurred:

    The nose has a slight emphasis on coriander. also Herbaceous Juniper, and a slight touch of citrus on the edges. The palate begins with fresh pine forest and lemon zest. Juniper is really the most striking thing about the palate. There’s a lot of depth and complexity in the background notes These notes include hints of violet, lemon, black peppercorn and fennel. The finish is dry, with still plenty of juniper. The residual notes of the palate include fennel seed and clover oil.

…and I thought it was quite an exquisite classic style gin. Really good on its own, but also with great promise for mixing.

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Gin Reviews

Genius Gin

genius-gin-bottle-full

Genius Gin is distilled in Austin Texas, which is quickly showing signs of becoming a distilling hotbed, and somewhat surprisingly to me, a hotbed for craft gin.

In our own (<100) words

Built Grain to glass with a local emphasis, Genius Gin is designed in part for the cocktail resurgence, but also with an eye towards a good gin which can be drank neat. Unabashedly contemporary in construction, it uses a “hot and cold” process to bring out the best in its botanicals. Half are infused at room temperature for 3 days, removed, and then that liquid is distilled with the remaining botanicals in a gin basket.

Tasting Notes

Sweet spice on top, a tad malty, grainy and bright, Zesty. Mid notes reveal more traditional gin profile, with lemon zest and just a touch of ethanol.

The palate reveals a pleasant, but never overwhelming warmth. Lime and citrus on top of the palate, but that fades nearly as quickly as it came on. The palate is dominated by sweet spicy notes: subdued rose, juniper, floral qualities, which crystallize more clearly on the finish. Hints of grass, a good deal of caradmom, citrus, lime and lavender.

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Gin Reviews

Vaiŏne Gin

vaione gin bottle

As far as I know, this review is a Gin is In exclusive. It also marks the first time I’ve had a gin from New Zealand.

New Zealand has a thriving distillers’ culture. It is the the only nation, which as of right, allows citizens to distill for their own personal use. Distillers who wish to sell, have to go through a permitting process. But if you’ve ever wanted to just experiment with distilling, New Zealand is the place for you.

It’s in this thriving culture that Vaiŏne’s origins lie. The gin here was originally a home distilled product from John Sexton [the gin’s website graciously provides newspaper clippings]. The Sexton family has taken their home distilled gin to the big leagues, and John’s award winning home distilled gin is now produced by him and his son Anthony, and is available in stores.

Vaiŏne does embody the sense of place: among the botanicals are locally grown New Zealand/South Pacific limes.

Tasting Notes

The nose is a little strong, a bit of heat, some citrus, orange and lemony notes, with some juniper and a faint touch of spice on the finish.

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Gin Reviews

Seagram’s Lime Twisted Gin

seagram's 2

You’re probably familiar with Seagram’s Gin if you’ve ever bought gin in the states. Its rather ubiquitous. It also is the only gin brand I know of which has its hand in ready made drinks, flavored gins, aged gin and regular gin. Seagram’s Gins are designed to cover a whole range of tastes at a rather inexpensive price point.

This is the first time we’ve had one of their twisted gins in the lab for a taste test. First, I want to note what it says on the front of the bottle: “Extra Dry Gin with Lime Liqueur.” Basically they take their main gin offering, and infuse it with a lime liqueur. Interesting, seeing as how as far as I’ve tasted, there are not many lime spirits out there. Lime and gin go together quite naturally, so let’s see how this spirit brings it all together.

Tasting Notes

Nose is definitely gin like, good deal of citrus and some juniper. Smells a tad sweet, but clearly gin. Tasting it neat it begins with a bit of a gin like edge, citrus, juniper, and angelica. The lime comes in loud and clear about halfway through the tasting.  

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