All Gins containing: Lavender

Gin Reviews

Candy Manor Gin

Candy-Manor-Gin

Price:  $31 / 750 mLABV: 40%Origin: Iceland Distiller:  Painted Stave DistillingAvailability: Delaware/Washington DC Rating: Heavy with the florals, it’s a bright contemporary styled gin rife with violet, lavender and spring meadow. Though some might be looking for a bit more juniper, it acquits itself well in summer staples like the Gin and Tonic or Gin Fizz, and is recommended to those looking for a floral summer gin.   (3/5)

The pinup model on the bottle calls to mind an intriguing tale of Prohibition era Smyrna. This one is probably best to just quote:

Story aside, Candy Manor gin is unabashedly contemporary style, proudly proclaiming their strong, and less traditional profile, distilled on a base from grain. But the distillers at Painted Stave are far from traditional. I’d suggest that they might be best known for their Scrapple Vodka; however.

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Gin Reviews

East London Liquor Company, Premium Gin: Batch 2

East-London-Dry-Gin

As if a pioneer organism, the East London Liquor Company has brought distilling back to London’s East End for the first time in over a hundred years. The re-purposed glue factory that they call home is where they distill their rum, vodka and line of gins, which number three at the moment. They have their entry level gin and two premium gins. One features tea and the other (the subject of this review) takes a more herbal forward approach featuring bay, sage, fennel and the unusual winter savory. Closely related to the summer savory, it played yin to summer’s yang.

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Gin Reviews

Pinckney Bend Cask Finished Gin

Pinckney-Bend-Aged-Gin

Pinckney Bend Gin is designed around the concept that if each botanical is distilled and crafted individually, a distiller can bring out the best in it. Basket and vapor infusion? Maceration and high heat distillation? It’s all about what best expresses the ingredient they’re working with. This gin starts as their American Dry Gin before being rested inside used, white oak barrels.

Tasting Notes

The gin is a gorgeous goldenrod hue, shimmering with a bright, almost translucent golden color. Inside the bottle, it’s certainly one of the most attractive barrel aged gins I’ve scene.

The nose shimmers as well, with spice, coriander, hints of vanilla, orange rind, and white peppercorn cracked over creme anglaise sauce.

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Gin Reviews

Spy Hop Distilled Gin

Spy Hop Gin Bottle

With extremely limited distribution, Spy Hop Distilled Gin, and the rest of the line which includes several other spins on the local fauna of the San Juan Islands are pretty much only available there. And by design too. By keeping their distribution radius small, they cultivate a local following, but also are able to experiment in ways, and on scales that a large scale distiller wouldn’t be able to.

Spy Hop gin is a study in the terroir of the San Juan Islands mashed up with a traditional, global, assortment of ingredients. Cardamom meet local lavender. Local barks meet lemon, orris root meet wild roses and so on.

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Gin Reviews

Ferdinand’s Saar Quince

ferdinands-saar-quince-spirit

Featuring 30 (!) botanicals, Ferdinand Saar Gin is already something of a beast. It combines common botanicals (angelica, coriander, ginger), less common, but still regularly seen ones (lavender, rose) and then there’s those which are really unusual (sloe, rarely seen as a botanical, lemon thyme) – but wait! It’s then cut with Riesling wine (Germany, kind of known for that). And in the case of the Quince gin, it’s a Sloe gin homage, using the local quince grown right at the distillery, with a touch of sweetening. It’s a lovely golden hue.

Impressions

On the nose, there’s ginger, wet, herbal notes, a touch of fruit, slight bits of rose and bobs of vanilla.

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Gin Reviews

Ginbrew Jenevieve

We took a closer look at the botanicals in the bag to see what was going into our gin.

This is kind of an odd review, because while we’re reviewing a botanical blend which is used to make gin, we’re not reviewing a gin per se. Let me explain.

We took a closer look at the botanicals in the bag to see what was going into our gin.

Recipes for making your own gin have been circling the internet for nearly a decade. Gin, by definition is an alcoholic spirit which gets its primary flavor from juniper. This means that even spirits in which the juniper has been added after distillation, a.k.a compound gins are still technically gin (for example Crater Lake Gin () and Tru2 ()) Compounded gins often have a different flavor profile, because the juniper [and other botanicals] are not distilled; therefore aromatics which might not come through as strongly during distillation are still present, in addition to all of the essential, and non-distillable oils present in the ingredients.

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Gin Reviews

Herbalist Gin

Herbalist Gin

Featuring a strong emphasis on local, from the base spirit (Red Winter Wheat) up through the botanical selection (and we quote “no tropical ingredients typically used in most gins”). Great Northern Distilling’s Herbalist Gin is evocative of what a Wisconsin distiller might have available to them. Taking two typical botanicals (juniper and coriander), the Great Northern team adds Rose Hips, lavender (the quintessential American botanical according to my friend David T. Smith) and Spruce Tips.

Tasting Notes

The first thing you’ll notice is just what a rich, luscious spirit this gin is. It has an oily and thick character that speaks to the quality of the canvas on which the team began their work, the nose bursts with lavender, creamy grain, and some aspects of juniper, though let it sit and it transcends the initial nose to become intensely floral, as musky, deep perfumed low notes from the rose and lavender rise to the fore.

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Gin Reviews

Genius Gin (Navy Strength)

Genius Gin Navy Strength Bottle

We were quite a fan of Genius Liquids’ Genius Gin when we tried it last year. We also got a bottle of their Navy Strength variety, so this is a long overdue look at that gin. It shares a lot in common with the 45% variety, so for details on Genius Liquids’ unique process we suggest checking out last summer’s review of Genius Gin ().

Impressions

Lavender, resiny, woody juniper and a hint of grain grace the nose, which has a distinct, warming impression. It seems slightly less vivid than their 45% offering; however, it shares the same inviting character.

The palate is loud and quite warm, and although this is as a Navy Strength Gin should be, it strikes me as less over-emphasizing the high proof than some other Navy Strength gins do.

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Gin Reviews

Monkey 47

monkey-47-bottle

The story of Monkey 47 is attributed to an Indian born British Commander who was stationed in Germany after the second world war. Inspired by the Black Forest through the lens of his family’s heritage he combined British influence, Indian botanicals, and the natural flora of the German forest to create a complex gin he called Schwarzwald Dry Gin, along with the note Max the Monkey. 

You see, this Commander also helped rebuild the world-famous Berlin zoo, and during the course of this he came to support Max, an egret monkey, who lived in the zoo. So it might seem natural that years after the fact in retirement, he retained an affection for the monkey he sponsored, and when he made his gin, he named it after him.

 

On botanicals alone, boasting an ostentatious 47, it might be the most complicated gin on the market, but to throw you one more curveball, it’s also built on a base spirit of molasses.

Tasting Notes

The nose is mentholated juniper, pineapple sage, lemon verbena, lavender, rose, hibiscus and lime. (!) This encyclopedic list merely reflects how incredibly complex and brightly aromatic this gin is.

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Gin Reviews

Austin Reserve Gin

austin-reserve-gin-bottle-final

Revolution Spirits you say? Yes, the revolution is certainly in the glass here. Only six botanicals are present: juniper, rosemary, lemongrass, grapefruit, lavender and pink peppercorn, built on a base spirit of Missouri corn and bottled at an assertive, but not overdone 100 proof, Austin Reserve Gin is confident, refined, and like the name might indicate, pushing the envelope just a tad.

Revolution Spirits is just one name in a burgeoning Austin, Texas Gin distilling scene, which already includes Genius Gin () and Treaty Oak Distilling whose Waterloo () and Waterloo Antique () have already set a high bar for Texas Gin.

Tasting Notes

While the Rosemary is the first thing you pick up on the nose, there’s more in the background to reward the careful noser/sniffer/soon-to-be-sipper. Lavender and grapefruit zest hover on the fringes as well, with a resiny juniper note a little further back.

The palate is clear and crisp juniper at first dancing with fresh garden picked juniper. There’s a floral hint in the background as well where orris meets lavender, and tart citrus rinds make themselves known as well— imparting a slight pithy bitterness which lingers through the medium long finish rife with resiny juniper, dried rosemary, and basil/sage notes as well.

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