All Gins containing: Hawthorn Berries

Gin Reviews

Dingle Gin

Dingle-Gin-Bottle

From one of only a couple distilleries in making gin in Ireland, they’ve come to making gin and vodka in the meantime while their flagship whiskey is given the time it needs to age [due for release, by the way, this year]. The botanicals are distilled in two steps, some are macerated for 24 hours before distillation, and the others are suspended in a gin basket. Their unique blend of botanicals that calls to mind the Irish landscape actually has a lot of overlap with other brands, particularly Scottish brands, with Rowan Berry, Bog Myrtle, and Heather set amidst some of the traditional juniper, angelica and coriander. Cut with local water, Dingle Gin is produced in small batches to be traditional and Irish all at the same time.

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Gin Reviews

Stovell’s Wildcrafted Gin

Stovell's WIldcrafted gin

Stovell’s is an award winning restaurant in Chobham, England. and their Wildcrafted Eponymous gin is a partnership of bar manager Geyan Surendran and chefs Kristy and Fernando Stovell.

The concept is simple: local, foraged botanicals. A truly local gin. Nothing is in the gin which cannot and does not grow locally. The only exception to their provenance rule is the juniper, which they source from Croatia due to their concern for the local juniper populations, which are still threatened in the UK.

Among the botanicals, couple standout: both angelica root and seed (toasted) are used, as are red efflorescent clover blossoms.

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Gin Reviews

Monkey 47

monkey-47-bottle

The story of Monkey 47 is attributed to an Indian born British Commander who was stationed in Germany after the second world war. Inspired by the Black Forest through the lens of his family’s heritage he combined British influence, Indian botanicals, and the natural flora of the German forest to create a complex gin he called Schwarzwald Dry Gin, along with the note Max the Monkey. 

You see, this Commander also helped rebuild the world-famous Berlin zoo, and during the course of this he came to support Max, an egret monkey, who lived in the zoo. So it might seem natural that years after the fact in retirement, he retained an affection for the monkey he sponsored, and when he made his gin, he named it after him.

 

On botanicals alone, boasting an ostentatious 47, it might be the most complicated gin on the market, but to throw you one more curveball, it’s also built on a base spirit of molasses.

Tasting Notes

The nose is mentholated juniper, pineapple sage, lemon verbena, lavender, rose, hibiscus and lime. (!) This encyclopedic list merely reflects how incredibly complex and brightly aromatic this gin is.

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