All Gins containing: Elderflower

Gin Reviews

Williams Chase Seville Orange Gin

Williams-Chase-Orange-Gin

Seville Orange photo from K.B.R. on Flickr.

Not just any orange gin, the Seville Orange is worth a closer look as its not the orange you’re probably thinking of. But this kind of orange often does appear in gin.

Let’s begin: there’s a large class of oranges known as “bitter oranges.” These include the Chinotto [yes, the beverage], the Bergamot, and a famous variety known by its hybrid name which is also the signature orange/citrus flavor of Grand Marnier.

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Gin Reviews

Stovell’s Wildcrafted Gin

Stovell's WIldcrafted gin

Stovell’s is an award winning restaurant in Chobham, England. and their Wildcrafted Eponymous gin is a partnership of bar manager Geyan Surendran and chefs Kristy and Fernando Stovell.

The concept is simple: local, foraged botanicals. A truly local gin. Nothing is in the gin which cannot and does not grow locally. The only exception to their provenance rule is the juniper, which they source from Croatia due to their concern for the local juniper populations, which are still threatened in the UK.

Among the botanicals, couple standout: both angelica root and seed (toasted) are used, as are red efflorescent clover blossoms.

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Gin Reviews

Sir Robin of Locksley Gin

Sir Robin of Locksley Gin Bottle

Named for local legend, “Robin Hood,” Sir Robin of Locksley Distilled Gin comes from Yorkshire. The vision was to create a sipping gin that combined some of the best of both worlds, Old Tom and the modern classic style.

Impressions

Clean pine-forward juniper on the nose. Sweet lemon and grapefruit rinds, with Elderflower and Coriander as well. The nose is a slightly floral take on the classic aroma. Quite nice.

The palate overall is a bit hot, with a fair amount of heat coming through from the alcohol.

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Gin Reviews

Genius Gin (Navy Strength)

Genius Gin Navy Strength Bottle

We were quite a fan of Genius Liquids’ Genius Gin when we tried it last year. We also got a bottle of their Navy Strength variety, so this is a long overdue look at that gin. It shares a lot in common with the 45% variety, so for details on Genius Liquids’ unique process we suggest checking out last summer’s review of Genius Gin ().

Impressions

Lavender, resiny, woody juniper and a hint of grain grace the nose, which has a distinct, warming impression. It seems slightly less vivid than their 45% offering; however, it shares the same inviting character.

The palate is loud and quite warm, and although this is as a Navy Strength Gin should be, it strikes me as less over-emphasizing the high proof than some other Navy Strength gins do.

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Gin Reviews

Monkey 47

monkey-47-bottle

The story of Monkey 47 is attributed to an Indian born British Commander who was stationed in Germany after the second world war. Inspired by the Black Forest through the lens of his family’s heritage he combined British influence, Indian botanicals, and the natural flora of the German forest to create a complex gin he called Schwarzwald Dry Gin, along with the note Max the Monkey. 

You see, this Commander also helped rebuild the world-famous Berlin zoo, and during the course of this he came to support Max, an egret monkey, who lived in the zoo. So it might seem natural that years after the fact in retirement, he retained an affection for the monkey he sponsored, and when he made his gin, he named it after him.

 

On botanicals alone, boasting an ostentatious 47, it might be the most complicated gin on the market, but to throw you one more curveball, it’s also built on a base spirit of molasses.

Tasting Notes

The nose is mentholated juniper, pineapple sage, lemon verbena, lavender, rose, hibiscus and lime. (!) This encyclopedic list merely reflects how incredibly complex and brightly aromatic this gin is.

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Gin Reviews

Warner Edwards Elderflower Infused Gin

warner-edwards-elderflower-gin

Last month we reviewed Gordon’s brand expansion Gordon’s Elderflower Gin ();  last summer we checked out Knockeen Hills’ variation Knockeen Hills Elderflower Gin (). Clearly Elderflower is still en vogue and gin drinkers are still looking for that unique floral note in their cocktails. How does Warner Edwards’ variation on the theme standup to others? And why wouldn’t you just buy some St. Germain to whip up some cocktails?

In our own <100 words

Warner Edwards’ Harrington Gin () received a boatload of accolades last year when they launched their now renowned Harrington Gin. We also quite liked it. Among the original botanicals* was Elderflower. It gave it a nice brightness. In this latest brand expansion, they’ve pushed the Elderflower to 11. This time its infused. Alike the other Elderflower gins on the market, the flowers are infused after distillation. Unlike other Elderflower gins….

Tasting Notes

The nose is much less literal than other Elderflower gins. Though the name aroma is present, there’s much more going on. For example, juniper, rich spices, cinnamon, cassia, and a lot of cardamom. The aroma is bright and finished with some hints of Elderflower, but it is much more understated than the competition.

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Gin Reviews

Gordon’s Elderflower Gin

gordons-elderflower-gin

Gordon’s stands in stark contrast to some of the other UK Big Names in terms of how they’re addressing the contemporary gin explosion. Whereas Greenall’s () more contemporary offshoots are branded under names like Bloom () and Berkeley Square (), which stand apart from the main brand; Gordon’s does no such thing. Have a gin that features cucumber: call it Gordon’s Cucumber Gin ().  If you put out an Elderflower, just call it Gordon’s Elderflower. Gordon’s remains all-business, and is clearly a testament to the strength they have in their name: despite the much ballyhooed seven-figure advertising budget for their gin,  Gordon’s thinks that flop or success, the name Gordon’s is capable of making it.

In Own <100 Words

One of the biggest names and brands in the world of gin looks to capitalize on the growing gin market, in particular growing contemporary gin market, with their second flavor in as many years. The consumer cocktail market for elderflower and elderflower flavored things, shows no signs of abating [in spite of bartenders the world around deriding it as the “ketchup of the cocktail world]. On-trend and on-mark, it’s built for gin and tonics and is also available in a pre-mixed canned G&T across the UK.

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Gin Reviews

Genius Gin

genius-gin-bottle-full

Genius Gin is distilled in Austin Texas, which is quickly showing signs of becoming a distilling hotbed, and somewhat surprisingly to me, a hotbed for craft gin.

In our own (<100) words

Built Grain to glass with a local emphasis, Genius Gin is designed in part for the cocktail resurgence, but also with an eye towards a good gin which can be drank neat. Unabashedly contemporary in construction, it uses a “hot and cold” process to bring out the best in its botanicals. Half are infused at room temperature for 3 days, removed, and then that liquid is distilled with the remaining botanicals in a gin basket.

Tasting Notes

Sweet spice on top, a tad malty, grainy and bright, Zesty. Mid notes reveal more traditional gin profile, with lemon zest and just a touch of ethanol.

The palate reveals a pleasant, but never overwhelming warmth. Lime and citrus on top of the palate, but that fades nearly as quickly as it came on. The palate is dominated by sweet spicy notes: subdued rose, juniper, floral qualities, which crystallize more clearly on the finish. Hints of grass, a good deal of caradmom, citrus, lime and lavender.

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Gin Reviews

Warner Edwards Harrington Dry Gin

Warner Edwards Harrington Dry Gin

Of all the gins to come out of the UK in the last few years, you’d be hard pressed to find one that’s had more accolades bestowed upon it than Warner Edwards Harrington Dry Gin.

Sion Edwards and Tom Warner [hence the name…] met in Agricultural school, are lifelong friends, and they’re not distilling gin on the Warner family farm. They consider themselves gin aficionados, so Warner Edwards Gin is a product of love and passion, trial and error. They’ve written the entire story themselves on their site, so I’d be remiss to paraphrase and re-write it all here. But suffice to say, their agricultural background means that this gin is steeped in all of the philosophies of craft spirits: good high quality ingredients, and good water, are all vital to make a good spirit.

My expectations are high heading in. Let’s get down to the tasting notes:

Tasting Notes:

Nose: Citrus and baking spice. Strong hints of cinnamon, nutmeg, coriander, cardamom and a faint hint that calls to mind cola. Quite interesting, and unique. Bright and spicy. The citrus seems squarely to be orange peel.

Palate: Very complex. Juniper, cinnamon, initially.

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Gin Reviews

Knockeen Hills Elderflower Gin

elderflowergin

Some gins you have a really abstract name and you don’t quite know what you’re getting into. Abstract concepts, animals, words, geography. All good names in and of themselves, but they tell you little to nothing about the spirit. A lot of times that’s where I come in.

Knockeen Hills’ Elderflower Gin. You don’t need a gin expert to tell you that there’s elderflower in this gin. It says right on the bottle. I will assure you. There’s truth in titles.

Tasting Notes: Nose: bright summer elderflower, surprisingly prominent juniper. And a bit of heat. Coming in at a respectable 47.3% ABV that note doesn’t seem out of place.

Palate: Licorice out of nowhere. It’s of the ilk of black jellybeans. I went back to check the nose. Not a whole lot not to indicate where this was coming from. Licorice notes fade, and you get a mid palate floral note without the usual sweetness of most elderflower spirits. Juniper, sharp stabbing in the middle. The finish is with a distinctive faintly citrusy spiciness [coriander likely] and a bit more licorice and flowers. The finish is enduring and a bit hot.

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