All Gins containing: Cassia

Gin Reviews

Lord Astor Gin

Astor-Gin

When I first picked this up last year, I naively, despite the name, didn’t realize this was the house brand at a Astor Place Wine and Spirits in New York City. Those of you who follow me on social media know that it’s one of my favorite liquor stores in the city and that I do often go there and I’ve extolled their virtues before. Little is shared about the details behind the gin. It’s 100% Grain neutral spirits [says the label], it’s distilled in England [says the label] in a copper still [says the website].

Designed to be of good quality at an affordable price, the appearance is simple enough, but how does it taste?

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Gin Reviews

Shortcross Wild Clover Gin

shortcross-gin

The Craft Gin Club tells the story best, in their March post to their members about this special edition of Shortcross Gin*. For those of you who aren’t going to click a link no matter how brief the article [four paragraphs!], the TL;DR is, “they boosted the Clover in their signature formula,” which by the way was unusual and exotic to start, with apple and elderberry alongside juniper, coriander, cassia, orange, and lemon.

Tasting Notes

Juniper and coriander, heady and rich on the nose. Furthermore, citrus zest, granny smith apple. and an interesting note that’s green, herbal and slightly floral. This is where the clover seems to come through. Though the Gin Club post seems to allude to the greens being present in here, I’m getting hints of clover blossom and not much green.

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Gin Reviews

Pierdas Almas +9 Botanicals

Pierdas-Almas-Bottle

Labeling is a problem. Let me explain. as is the case of Pierdas Almas +9 Botanicals. In the United States, one of the relics of the prohibition era laws written mostly for the ease of regulation than for the benefit of the customer is that “Officially,” a spirit may only be classified as one thing. So it doesn’t quite matter whether that spirit is technically both a Mezcal* and a Gin**. It can only be officially classified, and subsequently labeled as one thing.

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Gin Reviews

Malfy Gin

Malfy-Gin-Bottle

The Vergnano family drew from deep within the annals of distillation history for the inspiration for their Malfy Gin. About one thousand years ago (yes, really) monks in Italy were experimenting with primitive distilling techniques and the bounty of the Italian countryside. It’s extremely likely that at some point, owing to the fact that juniper grows widely throughout Italy, that monks experimented with juniper and therefore, drank one of the world’s first distilled juniper berry drinks. But I digress.

The Vergnano family’s gin is naturally distilled in a modern fashion, but similarly builds on the bounty of the Italian land: the base is Italian wheat, the juniper is from Tuscany, and the lemons are a blend of Sicilian and boutique Amalfi Coast lemons.

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Gin Reviews

Bourbon Barrel Gin from Watershed Distillery

Watershed-Distillery-Bourbon-Barrel-Gin

Distilled from corn, with the same botanical base as Watershed Distillery’s Four Peel Gin (Four citrus peels, get it?), also featuring performances from juniper, cassia, Jamaica pepper (better known as Allspice) and coriander. It’s then rested in bourbon barrels. The spirit looks like it enjoyed some quality time with the barrel, sporting a golden, maple wood hue. For this review, we’re tasting Batch 14.

Tasting Notes

Wood and citrus most prominently on the nose, Meyer Lemon, bitter orange notes, fresh cut wood, and an intriguing cherry undernote whose low notes have peppery and vivid cinnamon stick.

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Gin Reviews

Prairie Handcrafted Gin

Certified-Organic-Prairie-Gin-Bottle

The Prairie Brand is entirely organic, from start to finish, with every step of the process. The base spirit is distilled from dent corn, which is better known as the corn which is turned into chips, syrups, corn meals, in large part due to its high starch content. The grain is grown by a cooperative of farmers from across the state of Minnesota and makes its way into Prairie Handcrafted Gin via a partnership with the Phillips Distilling Company, who redistills the spirit with a classic gin botanical bill to create their signature gin

Tasting Notes

The nose isn’t too loud, with subtle hints of coriander and juniper, peppercorn and pine needles. Quite classic, but also quite restrained. Very nice, and classically inviting.

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Gin Reviews

Green Hat Navy Strength

Green-Hat-Navy-Strength-Gin

In intention, Green Hat’s year round Navy Strength gin packs a punch with not just Green Hat’s signature blend of botanicals, but some added juniper. Bottles at 114 proof, it’s designed to be your go-to cocktail gin. Like the other products from Michael Lowe and John Uselton’s New Columbia Distillers, the gin begins as Red Winter Wheat, mashed, fermented, and distilled on their traditional copper pot still, vapor infused with botanicals ranging from the traditional like lemon and juniper, to the less traditional like celery seed and grapefruit.

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Gin Reviews

Conniption Navy Strength Gin

Conniption-Navy-Strength

We’ve previously covered Durham Distillery’s Conniption American Dry Gin, and much is similar. Distilled via a two step process in a German built pot-still, Conniption Navy Strength Gin still splits the botanicals into two batches for distillation (vacuum, and traditional) to maximize the aromatics expressed in the final product.

Like other Navy Strength gins, this one is bottled at 57%, giving it a bracing on its own character that is well suited to cocktail mixing. But more on that in a bit.

Tasting Notes

On the nose, coriander, resinous juniper, a touch of English cucumber  and a delicate hint of caraway towards the back end.

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Gin Reviews

Martin Miller’s Gin

Martin-Miller's-Gin

Years ago. No, eons ago. We reviewed the Westbourne Strength () variant of Martin Miller’s gin, a spicier, warmer, stronger version of their original. The original has a dear place in my heart. It’s one of the gins that ignited the fire in me for the world of gin. It pushed the boundaries just enough to stand out from everything else behind the bar  at that time, but it stayed within familiar confines enough to be clearly and readily identifiable as gin. Martin Miller’s gin is one of the forebearers of today’s contemporary style. Keep in mind, that this gin was on shelves back in 1999.

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Gin Reviews

Star of Bombay London Dry Gin

star-of-bombay-london-dry-gin

To understand how Bombay Sapphire got its name, you must start at a place somewhat unexpected. The girl with the curls a.k.a. Mary Pickford was one of the most prominent silent Hollywood actresses. In 1909 alone, she appeared in fifty-one films, by 1916 it was said that only Charlie Chaplin was more popular. She starred in fifty two films throughout her career, earning a vast amount of wealth playing an all manner of character.

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