All Gins containing: Bitter Orange

Gin Reviews

nginious! Smoked & Salted Gin

nginious salted and smoked gin

Smoked and Salted.

I’ll forgive you if you thought we were talking about herring. But no, we are indeed talking about a Swiss gin from the team behind the nginious! line of gins, which we’ll be seeing more of in the coming weeks on here, thanks to David T. Smith who brought me some samples during a recent get together in California.

Using chestnuts, which are cold smoked for 40 (!) hours, and are subsequently macerated in spirit with ginger, quince, bitter orange, coriander and juniper, the smoked nuts are only half of the equation.

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Gin Reviews

Bourbon Barreled Big Gin

Big-Gin-Bourbon-Barrel-Aged

Bourbon Barreled Big Gin. 100% Corn base spirit, with a relatively traditional botanical bill buoyed by Tasmanian Pepperberry and Cardamom, the folks at Captive Spirits Distilling rest their flagship gin in barrels formerly used by Heaven Hill Distillery for their Bourbon.

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Gin Reviews

Bummer and Lazarus Gin

(yes, I was watching the Belmont Stakes while doing this review)

(yes, I was watching the Belmont Stakes while doing this review)

“Two Tails that wagged as one,” the label says, “dogs with but a single bark.: It might be a bit of a stretch to apply the story of this gin’s name to the gin itself, but it’s a good story so we’re going to anyway.

In a world where dogs outnumbered men, two dogs won their way into the heart of San Franciscans the city around.

The scene: a dog fight in an alley. Lazarus is getting badly beaten. Bummer enters from stage left. 

Bummer: Bark!

Bummer tends to Lazarus’ wounds. He makes an astonishing recovery, hence the name.

This summer, experience the heartwarming story of love, compassion,and the journey of two dogs who rose from the streets where they were raised to become two of San Francisco’s finest, going where no dogs have before.

Narrated by Mark Twain. Coming soon.

[okay, check out the story here if you want it a little more straight]

The gin itself is a grape based [California Grape Brandy] and boasts a rather traditional bill of botanical bill with a bold flavor profile, distilled on hand built stills.

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Gin Reviews

Monkey 47

monkey-47-bottle

The story of Monkey 47 is attributed to an Indian born British Commander who was stationed in Germany after the second world war. Inspired by the Black Forest through the lens of his family’s heritage he combined British influence, Indian botanicals, and the natural flora of the German forest to create a complex gin he called Schwarzwald Dry Gin, along with the note Max the Monkey. 

You see, this Commander also helped rebuild the world-famous Berlin zoo, and during the course of this he came to support Max, an egret monkey, who lived in the zoo. So it might seem natural that years after the fact in retirement, he retained an affection for the monkey he sponsored, and when he made his gin, he named it after him.

 

On botanicals alone, boasting an ostentatious 47, it might be the most complicated gin on the market, but to throw you one more curveball, it’s also built on a base spirit of molasses.

Tasting Notes

The nose is mentholated juniper, pineapple sage, lemon verbena, lavender, rose, hibiscus and lime. (!) This encyclopedic list merely reflects how incredibly complex and brightly aromatic this gin is.

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Gin Reviews

Ford’s Gin

Ford's gin bottle

You’re starting to see more and more of this: call it a bonafide trend if you must. Simon Ford made this gin for mixing. For bartenders. For mixologists. For the way that most people drink their gin.

Simon Ford comes with some rather lofty credentials. Some of the gins he’s recently worked with and on include: Plymouth ()Dorothy Parker () and Perry’s Tot (). In fact, in this gin blogger’s opinion not anywhere near a bad gin between them. Out of this experience, Ford’s Gin arose. London Distilled at Thames Distillers, the bottle and feel is steeped heavily in British Colonial icongraphy. References to India, travel, and empire are all prominently placed— and why not? After all, London Gin was distinctly colored by colonialism. The juxtaposition of Eastern hemisphere botanicals, Western Europe botanicals, and the lore of being consumed by shipmen of the British Navy, to do anything less would be a disservice to the history behind it? No?

But oddly Ford’s gin stands against a trend we’re seeing in gin distilling. While many distilleries are going local, or seeking to create a notion of place, Ford’s Gin uses history and lore to create a sense of place [and tradition].

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